Podcast: Spectres of fascism

A conversation with James Miller

A defining debate of the political moment? Or liberal hairsplitting? Eurozine talks to James Miller, editor of Public Seminar, about what we mean when we talk of fascism – and whether it makes any difference anyway.

‘Fascism’ has entered America’s political lexicon as a way to understand and oppose the rise of the far-right. Trump’s polemics against the left have also propelled the label ‘antifascism’ into the mainstream. But are we really seeing a US fascism? What baggage does the concept of ‘antifascism’ carry? And what are we doing when we invoke Weimar?

In this episode of Gagarin, the Eurozine podcast, editor Simon Garnett talks to James Miller, Professor of Politics and Liberal Studies at the New School for Social Research and editor of Public Seminar, about their collaboration on the focal point ‘Fascism for our time’.

Listen to this episode of Gagarin, the Eurozine podcast on SpotifyApple podcastsCastbox, Stitcher or Soundcloud.

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Published 29 October 2020
Original in English
First published by Eurozine

© Simon Garnett / James Miller / Eurozine

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