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Cover for: Freedom of movement

Freedom of movement

A European dialectic

Attitudes towards immigration are said to be split down an East–West divide, but it is western Europe that has traditionally feared ‘invasions’ from the East and that responded to EU enlargement in 2004 with restrictions on labour migration. Now that eastern and western Europe are more deeply integrated than ever before, the defining question will be how Europe negotiates immigration from outside its borders.

Cover for: No average country

Although on the rise, popular engagement with EU politics is still a poor reflection on European democracy. International coverage maintains a narrow focus, despite important and uneven developments in national politics throughout the Union. Eurozine’s series on the EP elections addresses this deficit.

Cover for: On the sociology of money

On the sociology of money

Mittelweg 36 3–4/2019

Twentieth-century social sciences tended to leave monetary questions to economists, but in recent years there has been an explosion in the sociological research of money. ‘Mittelweg 36’ offers perspectives.

Cover for: Sources of uncertain hope

Sources of uncertain hope

Czech Republic, Spain, Norway and Belgium after the EP elections

After May’s elections, Prague saw the largest public demonstration since the Velvet Revolution. The country now hosts the strongest Pirate Party in Europe, while Spain provides the largest national component in the S&D bloc. Norway may yet become Europe’s green battery, as Belgium faces a great divide.

Cover for: Without ifs or buts

Without ifs or buts

For a radicalization of the European Left

In order to become a force for the future, the European Left must rediscover a politics of class that combines social solidarity with radical economic critique. Challenging exclusory discourse on immigration is central to this process of renewal, argues political scientist Lea Ypi in an interview with ‘Il Mulino’.

Cover for: The miracle that never materialized

The miracle that never materialized

Finland, Hungary and Bulgaria after the EP elections

Peak populism could be said to characterize the political dynamic in all three countries, as Finns express the greatest dissatisfaction with the Right. But changes may well be on the horizon in Hungary and Bulgaria too, as the limits to euroscepticism become increasingly clear.

Cover for: ‘Mystification is a brutal process’

‘Mystification is a brutal process’

On the paradoxes of Romanian identity

In an interview with Andrea Pipino, Romanian historian Lucian Boia talks about Romanian identity from its Roman-Dacian beginnings through Ottoman and Austro-Hungarian rule, modernization, fascism, communism, and the paradoxical present, in which this extremely nationalistic country has no openly nationalist political party.

Cover for: Russian questions

Police violence, mass detentions, internet shutdown, arrest of opposition candidates: the reaction to the latest protests in Moscow has been an overreaction even by the standards of the Russian authorities. It seems that the government has good reason to be afraid of putting its popularity to the test. But is it advised to ask what next, given the sheer weight of resistance to democratization in Russia?

Cover for: Do they deliver?

Do they deliver?

The pro-Kremlin far right in power

Despite far-right parties’ criticism of EU sanctions on Russia, at national levels they lack the foreign policy leverage to be of direct use to Moscow. The strengthening of the far-right bloc in the European Parliament is also unlikely to alter the EU’s position. Does this mean that Russian influence on European politics is negligible?

chess figures opposed by colour

‘The Romanians are coming’

Emerging divisions and enduring misperceptions in contemporary Europe

Following changes to UK immigration law in 2014, the documentary ‘The Romanians are Coming’ promised the truth behind the headlines. Diana Georgescu finds a more troubling picture of Romanians, tied up with longstanding prejudices applied to eastern Europeans generally and Romani people in particular.

Cover for: Revolution as accelerated modernity

Revolution as accelerated modernity

Hannah Arendt and Anselm Jappe on radical social transformation

Though their approaches are very different, Hannah Arendt and Anselm Jappe take similar positions on the ambiguities of modernity and revolution. They not only analyse the contradictions of ‘modernity’, but show that the modern situation undermines the conditions for its existence, pointing towards its own revolutionary transformation.

Cover for: With religious fervour

With religious fervour

On the ‘New Atheists’

Giovanni Tiso reads the recently published transcript of the famous 2007 conversation between ‘New Atheists’ Daniel Dennett, Christopher Hitchens, Richard Dawkins and Sam Harris and asks why ridiculing your targets with sceptical tools has been so influential.

Cover for: Feminism in Turkey

Feminism in Turkey

History and contemporary agenda

The ‘question of women’s rights’ has been asked and answered in very different ways in Turkey since the founding of the secular republic in 1923. Ayşe Durakbaşa traces this history from ‘state feminism’ to the second wave and the Islamic Women’s Movement, shedding new light on the ruling AKP party’s legislative agenda.

Cover for: Violence and anti-violence

Violence and anti-violence

Ukraine between Russia and Europe

Western Europe’s culture of anti-violence continues to exert a magnetic pull on Ukrainian society. But will that be enough to resist Russia’s twenty-first century politics of dog-eat-dog? The answer depends on the strength of Europe’s own conviction, argues philosopher Volodymyr Yermolenko.

Cover for: The Rubicon has been crossed

The sight of the US president staring ahead impassively while around him the crowd chanted ‘Send her back’, felt like the crossing of the Rubicon. This was the point when Trump and his Republican supporters finally dropped the mask and revealed their contempt for the values underlying the liberal consensus.

Cover for: A ‘cultural reservation’

A recent study shows that cultural journals in Estonia provide a space for criticism not offered by larger media. The Estonian cultural journal sector is among the best-funded in Europe. Despite a conservative definition of the medium – only print journals qualify for support – journals retain full independence and the field is diverse.

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