Eurozine Review

‘Soundings’ gets down to the nitty gritty of opposition; ‘Czas Kultury’ says LGBT+ in Poland has lost its way; ‘Dublin Review of Books’ reflects on Trumpian neediness and British moralism; ‘dérive’ examines informality in Vienna, Belgrade and Paris; ‘Atlas’ considers religious atheists, social outcasts and a cause without rebels; and ‘New Literary Observer’ closes in on Franco Moretti’s distant reading.

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‘Blätter’ predicts a politicization of the Europe question; ‘Merkur’ argues that dominant theories of populism reaffirm liberal certainties; ‘Samtiden’ looks at tensions in Norway between town and country; ‘Host’ discusses women’s role in Charter ’77; and ‘Res Publica Nowa’ returns to the political life and thought of Leszek Kołakowski.

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‘New Eastern Europe’ wonders whether Putin is bored; ‘Osteuropa’ recognizes the unfinished work of Arseny Roginsky; ‘Kultūros barai’ celebrates the Lithuanian miracle; ‘Varlik’ regrets the Islamization of Istanbul; ‘Esprit’ calls for more democracy at work; and ‘Syn og Segn’ talks about men, women and children.

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‘La Revue Nouvelle’ talks about Belgium’s colonial legacies; ‘Vikerkaar’ marks one hundred years of Estonian multiculturalism; ‘Glänta’ notices differences in Sweden; ‘New Humanist’ confronts the rising tide everywhere; ‘Ord&Bild’ draws the line at the far-right; and ‘dérive’ writes from the rust belt.

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‘Esprit’ explores worlds of ecology; ‘Merkur’ talks class; ‘Dialogi’ looks at histories of feminism; ‘Belgrade Journal’ introduces voices from the Balkan route; ‘Il Mulino’ travels through a difficult but extremely beautiful country.

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‘Soundings’ and ‘Syn og Segn’ debate sovereignty and citizenship; ‘Index on Censorship’ asks if we protest enough – or too much; ‘Osteuropa’ makes a sober assessment of Czech politics; ‘Revolver Revue’ talks to concept artist Karel Miller; ‘New Eastern Europe’ investigates a growing generation gap; and ‘L’Homme’ revisits sisterhood.

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