Péter Krekó

is the director of Political Capital Institute, a think-tank based in Budapest, Hungary. He is also an assistant professor at ELTE University, and a co-chair of the EU Radicalisation Awareness Network Prevention working group.

Articles

Cover for: The miracle that never materialized

The miracle that never materialized

Finland, Hungary and Bulgaria after the EP elections

Peak populism could be said to characterize the political dynamic in all three countries, as Finns express the greatest dissatisfaction with the Right. But changes may well be on the horizon in Hungary and Bulgaria too, as the limits to euroscepticism become increasingly clear.

Cover for: Interference everywhere?

Interference everywhere?

Disinformation in the EP election

Although the Kremlin did try to interfere in European politics, focusing on Russia is misleading. Since some governments in the European Union are more interested in spreading fake news than stopping it, tackling disinformation cannot rely on them, Péter Krekó writes.

Cover for: The fear of being torn apart

The fear of being torn apart

Hungary, Estonia and Belgium before the EP elections

The products of Hungary’s post-truth laboratory are being received with increasing scepticism, while in Estonia the European elections will be a test of nerve following March’s general election. In Belgium, at least, things are just about holding together.

Cover for: Don't ignore the Left!

Don't ignore the Left!

Connections between Europe's radical Left and Russia

It’s not just Europe’s far right parties; the radical Left too has both personal and political connections to the Kremlin, write Péter Krekó and Lóránt Gyori. Moreover, the old “comrade networks” of Soviet times remain active.

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