15 September 2017

The alt-right: Reactionary rehabilitation for white masculinity

Alt-right extremism is a consequence of mainstream neo-conservative discourse on liberalism, manhood and national security post-9/11. Its success is measured by its ability to project an updated rhetoric of anti-left antagonism into the window of acceptable political discourse.

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The history of news is the history of the confusion between the real and the fake – with that master of disguise, the devil himself, never far away. Today, too, demonic involvement is readily invoked, perhaps to avoid the awkward question: what is the price of reliable information?

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Review

A little bit Trump

‘Soundings’ focuses on alt-right discourse and media practice; ‘Varlik’ reports from the front line of Turkey’s culture wars; ‘New Humanist’ examines the semantics of counter-terrorism; ‘New Eastern Europe’ identifies a (nearly-)new species; ‘A2’ re-reads Das Kapital 150 years on; ‘Vagant’ challenges conventional wisdom; and ‘Merkur’ discusses Europe between communio and commercium.

Angry modernism

‘Springerin’ voices angry modernism from across the former USSR; ‘Arche’ reveals facets of Belarusian urban history; ‘dérive’ reports on housing crises and Main Street myths; ‘Historein’ traces nationalist narratives in Greek historiography; and ‘Esprit’ explores sex and sexuality after the revolution.

The best ever

‘Blätter für deutsche und internationale Politik’ takes a leaf out of Kohl’s book; ‘Vagant’ reruns the Scandinavian experiment; ‘Dublin Review of Books’ suggests an Irish precedent for the Cyprus question; ‘Index on Censorship’ asks what 1917 means for freedom today; ‘Razpotja’ measures rhetoric against reality; ‘Merkur’ challenges middle-class aversion to party politics; ‘Ny Tid’ designs the best-ever utopia; ‘La Revue nouvelle’ understands algorithmocracy; ‘Dialogi’ looks at interculturalism in Slovene theatre; and ‘Ord&Bild’ suspects that Neanderthals were more easy-going.

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Paweł Pieniążek and Marci Shore discuss 'The War that Changed Us'

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