Eurozine Review

‘Merkur’ responds to Europe’s detractors; ‘Vikerkaar’ discusses what is to be done; ‘L’Homme’ examines dissident anti-feminism; ‘Arena’ asks what happened to Swedish sin; ‘Varlık’ uncovers post-truth complicities; ‘Index’ reports on consensus and dissent in Turkey; ‘NAQD’ debates fiction’s role in terror and memory; and ‘Wespennest’ re-familiarizes itself with the concept of alienation.

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‘Blätter’ calls for a courageous politics for Europe; ‘Arena’ talks to Göran Therborn about equality and populism; ‘Kritika & Kontext’ gathers old friends; ‘Samtiden’ discovers the feminist Qur’an; ‘Prostory’ assesses the protests in Belarus; ‘pARTisan’ revisits the collective farm; ‘New Literary Observer’ discusses mastery and slavery; and ‘Osteuropa’ reads Platonov.

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‘Varlık’ portrays Turkey’s first feminist poet; ‘New Humanist’ discusses racism and identity politics; ‘Passage’ seeks a different Denmark; ‘Glänta’ compares town and country; ‘La Revue nouvelle’ challenges managed immigration; ‘Soundings’ thinks beyond traditional forms of public ownership; ‘Merkur’ salvages the relationship between humans and nature; ‘Esprit’ says no to the mechanization of the world; and ‘Vikerkaar’ looks deeper into thingumajigs.

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