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RECET

The Research Center for the History of Transformations (RECET) is an institute for advanced research that takes the year 1989 as a starting point to think about social, economic, and cultural transformations in the wake of deep historical caesuras on a European and global scale. Its Transformative Blog and Transformative Podcast host scholars commenting on current affairs and discussing their cutting-edge research in the field of historical transformations.
RECET’s concept of transformation is inspired by Karl Polanyi and looks beyond the hegemonic post-1989 teleologies of marketization and democratization. This approach also allows us to take a long-durée perspective on transformations, with emphasis on the interdisciplinary connections to sociology, economics, and cultural and social anthropology. RECET follows the concept of Comparative Area Studies. Our focus on Central and Eastern Europe is enlarged by comparisons and the study of entanglements with other world regions, such as East Asia, and the co-transformation of Western countries.

Website: www.recet.at
Twitter/Facebook: @recetvienna
Youtube: RECET Vienna

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Articles

Cover for: Far cry from Dayton

Far cry from Dayton

How fractures have widened this far in Bosnia

Germany just pressured the Kremlin-backed Serbian minority leaders to momentarily withdraw some of their separatist ambitions by threatening to cancel funding. But the federal state’s constitution codifies political segregation, and leaves minorities without representation, a structural problem whose solution Republika Srpska is actively sabotaging.

General Winter, 1917 illustration

Preparing for the good times to be over

A month into Russia's invasion, is the EU ready for the challenge?

Russia’s war on Ukraine is clearly an attack on the whole of Europe, but domestic responses are still stuck with the narrative of patriarchal solidarity and the concern for consumer comfort on the home front. Philipp Ther argues for active solidarity, and with it, to prepare for the end of the convenience Europe has known: it may hurt, but without it, the long-term losses to freedom and welfare are likely to be higher.

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