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Green European Journal

The Green European Journal is an online and print political ecology magazine dedicated to analysis, debate and new ideas. Since its foundation in 2012, its transnational approach has gone beyond daily news to read politics and society in Europe with a fresh lens. In times of social and ecological crisis, attacks on democracy, and rapid technological change, the Green European Journal helps ideas travel across cultural and political borders, building solidarity and understanding.

Published twice a year, print editions explore topics ranging from the current state of democracy to geopolitics in a warming world. The online journal publishes weekly in English, with selected translations offered in 28 languages and counting. The magazine collaborates with partners across Europe to connect new audiences and open up spaces for transnational debate. Audio versions of selected articles on the Green European Journal podcast: Green Wave.

Subscriptions: https://www.greeneuropeanjournal.eu/subscribe-order/

Monthly newsletter: greeneuropeanjournal.eu/newsletter

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Cover of Green European Journal
Belgium

Articles

Cover for: Counting for nothing?

Economics tends to alienate women, who are largely excluded from its systematized theories; study environments for the subject are still male dominated. It’s high time for the work of once influential female economists, hidden from view for centuries, to make a comeback.

Cover for: A double-edged eco sword

Climate change affects us all yet not equally. The plight of those forced to migrate as a result – often called ‘climate refugees’, though not officially – has become contested ground between human rights/environmental activists and anti-asylum lobbyists. Could ‘ecologically displaced’, avoiding racialization, xenophobia and division, be a viable alternative?

Cover for: If every Monday were off

A four-day-working-week trial is underway in the UK. The long-awaited attempt to improve the nation’s poor work-life balance and reduce related environmental impacts coincides with the conservative government’s ‘zombie’ prime ministerial handover period – one much more seriously anticipated than the other.

Cover for: An effervescent wave

An effervescent wave

Romanian protests and political change

Standing up for your country’s social and ecological wellbeing can be a desperately meaningful undertaking when deep-seated corruption lies behind the struggle: the exodus of many Romanian protesters attests to the high personal risks that have compounded solidarity both at home and abroad over decades of action.

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