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CAIRN.info

Founded in 2005 by four Belgian and French academic publishers, Cairn.info offers the most comprehensive online collection of French journals in the various fields of humanities and social sciences. Its English interface, Cairn international edition, features tables of contents, abstracts and full-text articles (when available in English), as well as dossiers composed by specialized journalists, who take a look at current events through the prism of francophone scholarly publishing.

Cairn International Edition enables users to search, browse and read this content without speaking a word of French. Thousands of students, scholars and many others browse Cairn every day, with more than one million visits observed each year in non-francophone countries.

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Articles

Cover for: Homes, interrupted

Homes, interrupted

Housing policies in colonial Algeria

Public housing projects in French Algeria often sought to further the social and political aims of the colonisers. But residents weren’t always prepared to play ball.

Cover for: Parables of social housing

Parables of social housing

NAQD 38-39/2020

Annual journal ‘NAQD’ studies social housing policies under pressure, including: Algerian segregation and slums due to a wealth gap; the insidious sale of public projects in Iraqi Kurdistan; and India’s imbalance between burgeoning middle-class off-plan projects and affordable homes.

Cover for: The fatigue variant

The fatigue variant

Esprit 6/2021

‘Esprit’ addresses the growing coronavirus-provoked ‘epidemic of fatigue’, including: the underestimated mental health impacts on society at large, and youth in particular; a historical overview of exhaustion; and lessons for post-COVID economic recovery drawn from post-war France.

Cover for: Young and disobedient

Faced with government inaction on climate change, young people are increasingly engaging in civil disobedience. For those as yet unable to vote, the act of collectively removing the French president’s portraits from town halls is strikingly symbolic. Are such interventions a youthful rejection of politics or a new form of civic engagement?

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