Miriam Rasch

is a Rotterdam-based philosopher who works at the Institute of Network Cultures in Amsterdam. Her latest book is Frictie: Ethiek in tijden van dataïsme (Friction – Ethics in Times of Dataism), published in Dutch by De Bezige Bij, May 2020.

Rasch is a member of the Eurozine Board of Editors since 2019.

Articles

miriam_rasch_topical

If, like Miriam Rasch, you want to resist seamless dataism and de-automate your life, why not take a look at her recommended reading from the Eurozine archive spanning articles from the politics of digitization to poetry’s ability to creatively engage with fragmentation.

Cover for: Faire l’idiot!

Being an idiot might be exactly the subversive tool we need in our communication-obsessed world, suggests Miriam Rasch. In times of heightened surveillance capitalism, non-communication can become active interference. It might not quite be time to throw away your phone, but inefficiency and deceleration could be useful tools.

Cover for: Why data won’t redeem us

Why data won’t redeem us

Introducing Gagarin, the Eurozine podcast

What does the worship of big data have to do with positivism, and how does friction help create resistance? Philosopher Miriam Rasch talks about her essay in the inaugural episode of Gagarin, the new Eurozine podcast.

Cover for: Friction and the aesthetics of the smooth

Friction and the aesthetics of the smooth

Ethics in times of dataism

Seamless design is an important dogma of dataism. Without unpredictable behaviour, however, there’s no data to retrieve. A wholly predictable future is just a continuous present, a tyranny of choices on offer.

Cover for: Zine renaissance and hyperlocal news

Zine renaissance and hyperlocal news

Eurozine podcast part 2: Local journalism in the digital age

Globalization was supposed to connect people but instead ended up connecting the powerful. Local news is rapidly disappearing, a side-effect of digitalization and the ownership concentration in media markets. In an age of technological changes and political pressure, niche publications and a renaissance of zines lead the quest for new, sustainable models in publishing.

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