Freedom of speech under duress in Belarus, Poland and Ukraine

A discussion by New Eastern Europe

Poland is descending on a path toward more and more authoritarian tactics to curb independent journalism, while Belarus has long been enduring direct repression, especially since last year’s revolution. In Ukraine, however, the majority of mainstream media is owned by oligarchs, and public service is trying to gain ground to balance them out.

This online discussion is a continuation of a discussion held in July during the 2021 Eurozine Meeting titled ‘Watch your mouth: Journalism under duress’ which featured journalists from Russia, Turkey and Hungary. This time we will focus on three more countries that have been in the spotlight lately: Belarus, Ukraine and Poland.

Speakers:
Opening remarks by Joanna Stolarek, Director of the Heinrich-Böll-Stiftung Warsaw Office
Veranika Laputska (Belarus)
Vitalii Rybak, Internews (Ukraine)
Katarzyna Przyborska and Agniszeka Wisniewska, Krytyka Polityczna (Poland)
The discussion is co-moderated: Réka Kinga Papp (Eurozine) and Adam Reichardt (New Eastern Europe).
Here you can see previous discussions in this series of talk on the topic of press freedom and editorial integrity: Watch your mouth: Journalism under duress”
The discussion is organized by The Jan Nowak-Jezioranski College of Eastern Europe the publisher of New Eastern Europe, together with Eurozine and in partnership with the Jagiellonian University Institute of European Studies. Funding for this discussion is provided in part by the Heinrich Boell Foundation’s Warsaw Office.

Published 28 October 2021
Original in English

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