Marius Ivaskevicius

(b. 1973) is a novelist, playwright, screenwriter, and director. His novel History From The Cloud [Istorija nuo debesies] was published in 1998 and in Polish translation by Czarne publishers in 2001. His play Madagascar [Madagaskaras] was published in 2004. Marius Ivaskevicius has also directed three documentaries, most recently Two on the bridge [Dviese ant tilto, 2004], together with Valdas Navasaitis.

Articles

Cover for: In love with Europe

“I spent my childhood in a dystopia, which I detested with my whole heart, and I now live in a utopia.” Lithuanian author Marius Ivaškevičius explains why Brexit felt to him like a betrayal, why Europe remains a beacon of hope for people living under authoritarian regimes, and why, despite the sceptics, the European idea will prevail.

Lithuanian novelist and playwright Marius Ivaskevicius is highly rated in the Baltic States, Poland, and Hungary for his humorous observations of contemporary life. Now Eurozine publishes, in English translation, his seven-part Scandinavian travelogue. In part VI, Ivaskevicius became the northernmost European. This week, fighting the urge to go even further north, he turns back, and, trying to discern the essence of Scandinavia, walks headfirst into a blizzard. His journey, and our story, ends here.

Lithuanian novelist and playwright Marius Ivaskevicius is highly rated in the Baltic States, Poland, and Hungary for his humorous observations of contemporary life. Now Eurozine publishes, in English translation, his seven-part Scandinavian travelogue. In part V, Ivaskevicius entered Christmas card heaven in northern Norway. But the journey north doesn’t end there. This week he finally becomes the northernmost European. Then it’s back to the charming port of Honningsvag, where he shares a birchless sauna with the socialist mayor and discovers that football is a spiritual matter.

Lithuanian novelist and playwright Marius Ivaskevicius is highly rated in the Baltic States, Poland, and Hungary for his humorous observations of contemporary life. Now Eurozine publishes, in English translation, his seven-part Scandinavian travelogue. In part IV, he reached the edge of the Arctic Circle. But the North has a hypnotic effect, and in part five he now he presses on to Lake Inar and Christmas card heaven. Then it’s west into Norway and Sami territory… if only someone would tell him where the Sami are.

Lithuanian novelist and playwright Marius Ivaskevicius is highly rated in the Baltic States, Poland, and Hungary for his humorous observations of contemporary life. Now Eurozine publishes, in English translation, his seven-part Scandinavian travelogue. Here, he turns his attention to Finland, which, like Lithuania, has a history of embattled independence. The Swedes, meanwhile, are scathing about their neighbour’s unpolished charms; these are demonstrated to the author in convincing fashion by an actress from the Helsinki Theatre. At last, he writes, a nation that can hold their own with the Lithuanians over a round of drinks.

Lithuanian novelist and playwright Marius Ivaskevicius is highly rated in the Baltic States, Poland, and Hungary for his humorous observations of contemporary life. Now Eurozine publishes, in English translation, his seven-part Scandinavian travelogue. Here, he remembers his first trip to Sweden, where he learned the meaning of an honest day’s work and fell in love with a blonde in an Opel. And how different Sweden seemed when he returned ten years later as a writer.

Lithuanian novelist and playwright Marius Ivaskevicius is highly popular in the Baltic States, Poland, and Hungary for his humorous observations of contemporary life. Now Eurozine publishes, in English translation, his seven-part Scandinavian travelogue. Here, he contemplates latter-day Vikings (they play jazz), and why Lithuanians don’t like getting their feet wet.

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