Jan-Werner Müller

is professor of politics at Princeton University. His publications include: Another Country: German Intellectuals, Unification and National Identity, Yale UP 2000; A Dangerous Mind: Carl Schmitt in Post-War European Thought, Yale UP, 2003; Memory and Power in Post-War Europe: Studies in the Presence of the Past (ed.), Cambridge UP 2002; German Ideologies since 1945: Studies in the Political Thought and Culture of the Bonn Republic (ed.), Palgrave 2003. His book Constitutional Patriotism is forthcoming from Princeton University Press in 2007.

Articles

Cover for: Europe's twin dangers

Europe's twin dangers

Normative disintegration, normative disengagement

Should anti-democratic populism continue to cast a shadow across the continent, Europe may well succumb to a creeping process of disintegration, warns Jan-Werner Müller. Now is the time for renewed political engagement, if Europe’s democracies are not to start slowly corroding from within.

Rising to the challenge of constitutional capture

Protecting the rule of law within EU member states

Despite being well aware of the stakes involved in member states such as Hungary, writes Jan-Werner Müller, the European Commission still lacks fully convincing instruments to deal with constitutional capture: a government’s systematic weakening of checks and balances.

A lion monument in front of the Hungarian Parliament

Democracy protection in the EU revisited

What, if anything, is wrong with a Copenhagen Commission?

Jan-Werner Müller deals with critical issues raised by his proposals for a Copenhagen Commission: an independent institution specifically tasked with alerting Europe to threats to democracy, the liberal rule of law and individual rights such as those currently seen in Hungary.

Cover for: The failure of European intellectuals?

Intellectuals have been accused of failing to restore a European confidence undermined by crisis. Yet calls for legitimating European narratives – combined with nostalgia for a golden age of Europeanism – remain faithful to the logic of nineteenth-century nation building, argues Jan-Werner Müller. What, then, should Europe’s intellectuals be doing?

Is Germany's future still European?

An interview with Jan-Werner Müller

Germany’s politicians lack deep European convictions yet are susceptible to calls for a more strident role in Europe; and while the mainstream is unlikely to give up what it sees as the recipe for German success, “constitutional patriotism” could allow for greater Europeanization. Jan-Werner Müller talks to Esprit about German contradictions.

A "pause for thought" without the thought?

Possible ways to talk about the future of the EU today

After the rejection of the EU constitution in the French and Dutch referenda, Europe’s elites launched a one-year “pause for thought” in the ratification process. A summit in June 2006 brought an extension of the adjournment. The time could be put to good use, writes political scientist Jan-Werner Müller. Theoretically speaking, there are three Euro-visions currently competing; a discussion of their pros and cons would be well worth Europeans’ while.

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