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Eurozine Review

The Lilliput syndrome

'Transit' responds to Russia's politics of fear; 'New Eastern Europe' condemns human rights pragmatism; 'Index on Censorship' defends the right to anonymity; 'Vikerkaar' talks trees; 'Czas Kultury' considers conspiracy theories; 'Ord&Bild' reports on heritage wars; 'dérive' confronts the new housing question; 'Letras Libres' declines populisms; and 'Vagant' has no fun with industrial. [ more ]

Katja Garmasch

A new start that's full of contradictions

Andrei Sannikov

Existence without life

Klas Grinell

Carpets and ceramics

Jane Costlow

The dissident history of trees

Eurozine Review

Eurozine Review

The Lilliput syndrome

'Transit' responds to Russia's politics of fear; 'New Eastern Europe' condemns human rights pragmatism; 'Index on Censorship' defends the right to anonymity; 'Vikerkaar' talks trees; 'Czas Kultury' considers conspiracy theories; 'Ord&Bild' reports on heritage wars; 'dérive' confronts the new housing question; 'Letras Libres' declines populisms; and 'Vagant' has no fun with industrial.

Eurozine Review

The violent closet?

Eurozine Review

Peak democracy?

Eurozine Review

Critical junctures

Eurozine Review

The narrowest of margins

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Dilema veche Articles
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Articles published in Eurozine

Andrei Plesu

The art of aging in Christian life

One almost wonders what Christianity has added to Roman writers' reflections on old age, writes Andrei Plesu. The answer: a much greater emphasis on transcendence. But how might the dimension of transcendence contribute to a better understanding and use of old age? [more]


Yudit Kiss

What pushes eastern Europe's Roma to the West?

One of the highlights of Hungary's EU presidency was the launching of the EU Framework for National Roma Integration Strategies. But a closer look at the situation of the Hungarian Roma provides an alarming picture, writes Yudit Kiss. And more than sufficient reason to head westwards. [Romanian version added] [more]


Andreas Fisahn

Four years Merkel, four years eurocrisis

The German government's neoliberal route to a competitive Europe, together with Brussels' authoritarian governance of the economy, seems to have won acceptance: to Europe's detriment. Andreas Fisahn says it's high time to revise the Treaties of the European Union. [Romanian version added] [more]


Ivan Krastev

The transparency delusion

Disillusionment with democracy founded on mistrust of business and political elites has prompted a popular obsession with transparency. But the management of mistrust cannot remedy voters' loss of power and may spell the end for democratic reform. [more]


Roger Scruton

Unreal estate

Freemarket disregard for the elementary moral truths of debt and obligation is to blame for the current crisis, says Roger Scruton. But the call for a return to economic morality is no endorsement of the financial fictions of the social democratic state. [more]


Ovidiu Nahoi

War in Europe? Not so impossible

The dark warnings of the Polish finance minister about the prospect of war in Europe if the crisis deepens were met with scepticism. But there is no call for complacency about where current, nationalist tendencies might lead, writes the editor of "Adevarul Europa". [more]


Ivan Krastev

Democratic, can travel

The Russian regime's abandonment of the ideology of public interest prevents it being measured against its own standards, while its policy of open borders diffuses protest from a dissatisfied middle class. Ivan Krastev on reasons for authoritarianism's tenacity. [Hungarian version added] [more]


Ivan Krastev, Gleb Pavlovsky, Tatiana Zhurzhenko

The politics of no alternatives

An interview with Gleb Pavlovsky

Gleb Pavlovsky, erstwhile political advisor to Vladimir Putin, whose election campaigns he masterminded in 2000 and 2004, talks to "Transit" about the workings of power in the Soviet Union and in post-Soviet Russia. [more]


Remi Nilsen

The literal metaphors of a terrorist

Is there something extreme in Norwegian society? asks Remi Nilsen, editor of the Norwegian edition of "Le Monde diplomatique" after the tragedy in Oslo. Anders Behring Breivik's writings are not the wild fabulations of a madman. We have heard it all before. [more]


Knut Olav Ĺmĺs

More debate, not less

"More debate" and "more democracy" has been the quiet call of defiance after the terror attacks in Norway. A good idea, says Knut Olav Ĺmĺs, culture and op-ed editor at "Aftenposten" -- but one that also brings discomfort. Conflicts in society must remain visible. [more]


Kenan Malik

The tragic ironies of Breivik's terror

The irony is not just that Breivik's hatred of Islam should lead to a horror that many took to be Islamic, but also that nothing so resembles Breivik's mindset as that of an Islamist jihadist, writes Kenan Malik. Both use the language of the "clash of civilizations" to justify their atrocities. [more]


Daniel Daianu

Markets and society

When high finance cripples the economy and corrodes democracy

The current financial crisis is not confined to economies, writes former Romanian finance minister Daniel Daianu. The erosion of the middle class, the spread of extremism and the threat to democracy are some of the more obvious social effects demanding attention. [more]


Slavenka Drakulic

Who created Ratko Mladic?

What remains after a war criminal has been sent to The Hague

When Ratko Mladic asks who it was who voted for Milosevic, he has a point, comments Slavenka Drakulic. Will trading off Mladic for the EU allow Serbs to avoid the question of collective responsibility? [more]


Gabriel Liiceanu, Herta Müller

When personal integrity is not enough

Herta Müller and Gabriel Liiceanu discuss language and dissidence

Talking to the philosopher Gabriel Liiceanu in Bucharest in October 2010, the novelist Herta Müller defended her often unpopular view that the preservation of personal intellectual integrity alone was inadequate as a form of political resistance during communism. [more]


Adam Michnik, Andrei Plesu

The logic of accusation has no end

Adam Michnik and Andrei Plesu discuss "resistance through culture"

For Adam Michnik, resistance to communism took many forms: reproaching another for their lack of heroism is impossible. Talking to Andrei Plesu in Bucharest in February 2011, he called for an end to the logic of accusation and warned against instrumentalizing the quarrel with communism. [more]


George Blecher

Whispering on paper

Email, text messaging and social networks have revolutionized the way we communicate. Yet as the magic of instantaneity fades, George Blecher begins to miss some good old-fashioned penmanship. [more]


Ghania Mouffok

Algeria: A country in search of its movement

A brief account of the Years of Fire

In Algeria, the uprising is being kept down by political propaganda and police brutality. Ghania Mouffok describes the deep anger of a population that has been living under a state of emergency since 1992, asking whether the street can join with the liberal elite to depose the corrupt and complacent government. [more]


Cristian Ghinea, Zoltán Pogátsa

What kind of capitalism for eastern Europe?

Deficits are the result of unsustainable processes, says political economist Zoltán Pogátsa in interview. Merely cutting expenditure leads to general decline: eastern European countries instead need to review the functioning of the state and its subsystems. [more]


Jacques Rupnik

The crisis and the end of liberalism in central Europe

Even as the state took over large portions of the private banking sector in the US and UK, politicians in central Europe were singing the praises of Anglo-Saxon market liberalism. They are the last orphans of Bush and Cheney, writes Jacques Rupnik. [more]


Valeriu Nicolae

On France, Gobineau, colonialism and the Roma

Attempts by successive French governments to deal with Roma migrants smacks of colonial racism, argues Valeriu Nicolae. Deportation will not solve anything; the problems that exist in Roma settlements are the result of decades of indifference. [more]


Olivier Peyroux

The Roma: A new political weapon?

The notion that cultural difference is to blame for the marginalization of the Roma is a myth, writes Olivier Peyroux. Lack of public awareness of successful Roma integration compounds their permanent pariah status. [more]


Cristian Ghinea, Constantin Vica

The digital Pharmakon

What is the difference between voluntary and involuntary self-revelation online? Is the regulation of Internet privacy a matter for the state, or must the web community negotiate its own privacy norms and strategies? A conversation between a connoisseur and a neophyte. [more]


Boyan Manchev

The metaseminar

Theses on education and the experience of critical thought

The Bologna reforms embody a narrowly utilitarian turn in higher education policy and are more a cause for concern than for celebration. A critique of the pragmatic reduction of knowledge and plea for the university as "locus of the unconditionally political". [more]


Mikhail Khodorkovsky, Lyudmila Ulitskaya

"The most important thing here is self-discipline..."

The Khodorkovsky-Ulitskaya correspondence

"Looking for loopholes in the law and exploiting them - this was the most that we allowed ourselves. And we got our kicks from showing the government the mistakes it had made in legislation." Mikhail Khodorkovsky confides in novelist Lyudmila Ulitskaya. [more]


László Rajk, Martin M. Simecka

Dilemma '89: My father was a communist

Two sons of well-known persecuted communists discuss the still unanswered questions surrounding the involvement of their fathers' generation in post-war communism, and the failings of today's debate about the past in the former communist countries. [more]


Kenan Malik

How to become a real Muslim

The media has colluded with self-promoting but marginal Muslim clerics to create a cycle of self-reinforcing myths around the Mohammed cartoons. The fear of causing offence undermines progressive trends in Islam and strengthens the hand of religious bigots. [more]


Corneliu Balan

Romania: Bologna versus entrenched interests

Critique of Bologna in Romania is a pretext for academic complacency and professional self-preservation, writes Corneliu Balan. The problem is not the Bologna system as such but the subordination of education to political interests and the privatization of the universities. [more]


Ioana Bot

European university reform

Ten propositions in search of an answer

What in the US has been a tradition of collaboration between universities and prosperous private business, in Europe risks turning into an acceptance of the dictates of the economy. On the "entrepreneurial university" and other myths of Bologna. [more]


Slavenka Drakulic

Why I have not returned to Belgrade

Is it to spare her emotions that Slavenka Drakulic has not returned to Belgrade since the wars? She doesn't think so. Instead, her reasons have to do with the silence and denial of so much of Serbian society, and with a youth that is failing to ask the right questions. [more]


Slavenka Drakulic

Tito between legend and thriller

A museum to Tito at his one-time summer residence glorifying the Yugoslav dictator is in stark contrast to a damning new biography, finds Slavenka Drakulic. Yet between the two extremes is an absence of objective history-writing in the former Yugoslavia. [more]


Christian Lequesne

The dissident generation, the European idea and transatlantic divergence

In the former satellite states, the legacy of '89 includes a hawkish Atlanticism that endures to the present, writes Christian Lequesne. The recent open letter to President Obama signed by Walesa, Havel and other luminaries speaks of a fading relationship. [more]


Miklós Haraszti

In God's name

A new UN proposal condemning "defamation of religion" cements oppressive governments' control of free speech while still sounding compatible with the advanced multiculturalism of liberal democracies, writes Miklós Haraszti. [more]


Martin M. Simecka

Still not free

Why post-'89 history must go beyond self-diagnosis

The dissident generation of the 1970s and 1980s produced a body of work unprecedented in Czech history, says Martin Simecka. Yet it is precisely the monumentality of this generation's legacy that prevents the interpretation of the communist past going beyond self-diagnosis. [more]


Agnes Heller

Twenty years on

"In opposition, they do not comport themselves as the opposition to a democratically elected government. When they become the governing party, they pursue the same paternalistic, populist game." Agnes Heller's indictment of Hungarian politicians twenty years after 1989. [more]


Timothy Snyder

Holocaust: The ignored reality

Auschwitz and the Gulag are generally taken to be adequate or even final symbols of the evil of mass slaughter. But they are only the beginning of knowledge, a hint of the true reckoning with the past still to come, writes Timothy Snyder. [more]


G.M. Tamás

A response to Andrei Plesu

"Undoubtedly, leftwingers exist who can find excuses for the Soviet penal universe. But I don't regularly discuss matters with them". G.M. Tamás responds to Andrei Plesu's assertion that "The Left [...] hides the Gulag behind a veil of 'historical necessity'." [more]


Andrei Plesu

Some comments to G.M. Tamás

"Undoubtedly, leftwingers exist who can find excuses for the Soviet penal universe. But I don't regularly discuss matters with them". Thus responded G.M. Tamás to Andrei Plesu's assertion that "The Left [...] hides the Gulag behind a veil of 'historical necessity'." Plesu adds a concluding comment. [more]


Andrei Plesu

The Left treading on the Right

"The Left is impudent, cheeky," writes Romanian philosopher Andrei Plesu in "Dilema veche". "It hides the Gulag behind a veil of 'historical necessity'." A provocative statement that has prompted a response from the Hungarian political scientist G.M. Tamás. [more]


Daniel Daianu

For a return to common sense

The Romanian MEP criticizes neoliberal development policies divorced from "concrete local conditions" and instead pleads for market reforms that, while stimulating growth in poorer countries, are implemented "pragmatically". [more]


Jerry Coyne, Steve Jones, James Randerson, John von Wyhe

Dinner with Darwin

On the 200th anniversary of Darwin's birth and the 150th anniversary of "The Origin of Species", "New Humanist" editor Caspar Melville asks a selection of scientific commentators what they'd like to say to Darwin around the supper table. [more]


Ioana Avadani

Hey Jude

Media self-regulation in Romania

Media self-regulation has many advantages over the more intrusive forms of state legislation, argues Ioana Avadani. Not only would it help raise professional standards in Romania, it might create greater responsibility towards the public that now trust journalists so implicitly. [more]


Mircea Vasilescu

Romania: The quality of the press and the quality press

The more that the Romanian press professionalizes, the more it is discovering the conflict between editorial content and market demands, writes "Dilema Veche" editor Mircea Vasilescu. [more]


Mircea Vasilescu

Fragile new Europe

Despite talk of a "unified European plan" to combat recession, the motto among EU member states seems to be "each to his own". The financial crisis is reimposing the divide between eastern and western Europe, writes Mircea Vasilescu. [more]



Articles published in the partner section


Focal points     click for more

Ukraine: Beyond conflict stories
Follow the critical, informed and nuanced voices that counter the dominant discourse of crisis concerning Ukraine. A media exchange project linking Ukrainian independent media with "alternative" media in Germany, France, Spain, Italy and Greece. [more]

Ukraine in European dialogue
Post-revolutionary Ukrainian society displays a unique mix of hope, enthusiasm, social creativity, collective trauma of war, radicalism and disillusionment. Two years after the country's uprising, the focal point "Ukraine in European dialogue" takes stock. [more]

Culture and the commons
Across Europe, citizens are engaging in new forms of cultural cooperation while developing alternative and participatory democratic practices. The commons is where cultural and social activists meet a broader public to create new ways of living together. [more]

2016 Jean Améry Prize collection
To coincide with the awarding of the 2016 Jean Améry Prize for European essay writing, Eurozine publishes essays by authors nominated for the prize, including by a representative selection of Eurozine partner journals. [more]

The politics of privacy
The Snowden leaks and the ensuing NSA scandal made the whole world debate privacy and data protection. Now the discussion has entered a new phase - and it's all about policy. A focal point on the politics of privacy: claiming a European value. [more]

Beyond Fortress Europe
The fate of migrants attempting to enter Fortress Europe has triggered a new European debate on laws, borders and human rights. A focal point featuring reportage alongside articles on policy and memory. With contributions by Fabrizio Gatti, Seyla Benhabib and Alessandro Leogrande. [more]

Russia in global dialogue
In the two decades after the end of the Cold War, intellectual interaction between Russia and Europe has intensified. It has not, however, prompted a common conversation. The focal point "Russia in global dialogue" seeks to fuel debate on democracy, society and the legacy of empire. [more]

Eurozine BLOG

On the Eurozine BLOG, editors and Eurozine contributors comment on current affairs and events. What's behind the headlines in the world of European intellectual journals?
In memoriam: Ales Debeljak (1961-2016)
On 28 January 2016, Ales Debeljak died in a car crash in Slovenia. He will be much missed as an agile and compelling essayist, a formidable public speaker and a charming personality. [more]

Conferences     click for more

Eurozine emerged from an informal network dating back to 1983. Since then, European cultural magazines have met annually in European cities to exchange ideas and experiences. Around 100 journals from almost every European country are now regularly involved in these meetings.
Mobilizing for the Commons
The 27th European Meeting of Cultural Journals
Gdańsk, 4-6 November 2016
The Eurozine conference 2016 in Gdańsk will frame the general topic of solidarity with a focus on mobilizing for the commons. The conference will take place in the European Solidarity Centre in Gdańsk thus linking contemporary debates to the history of a broad, non-violent, anti-communist social movement which has started in the city's shipyard in 1980. [more]

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Time to Talk     click for more

Time to Talk, a network of European Houses of Debate, has partnered up with Eurozine to launch an online platform. Here you can watch video highlights from all TTT events, anytime, anywhere.
Neda Deneva, Constantina Kouneva, Irina Nedeva and Yavor Siderov
Does migration intensify distrust in institutions?
How do migration and institutional mistrust relate to one another? As a new wave of populism feeds on and promotes fears of migration, aggrandising itself through the distrust it sows, The Red House hosts a timely debate with a view to untangling the key issues. [more]

Editor's choice     click for more

Jürgen Habermas, Michaël Foessel
Critique and communication: Philosophy's missions
Decades after first encountering Anglo-Saxon perspectives on democracy in occupied postwar Germany, Jürgen Habermas still stands by his commitment to a critical social theory that advances the cause of human emancipation. This follows a lifetime of philosophical dialogue. [more]

Literature     click for more

Karl Ove Knausgĺrd
Out to where storytelling does not reach
To write is to write one's way through the preconceived and into the world on the other side, to see the world as children can, as fantastic or terrifying, but always rich and wide-open. Karl Ove Knausgĺrd on creating literature. [more]

Jonathan Bousfield
Growing up in Kundera's Central Europe
Jonathan Bousfield talks to three award-winning novelists who spent their formative years in a Central Europe that Milan Kundera once described as the kidnapped West. It transpires that small nations may still be the bearers of important truths. [more]

Literary perspectives
The re-transnationalization of literary criticism
Eurozine's series of essays aims to provide an overview of diverse literary landscapes in Europe. Covered so far: Croatia, Sweden, Austria, Estonia, Ukraine, Northern Ireland, Slovenia, the Netherlands and Hungary. [more]

Debate series     click for more

Europe talks to Europe
Nationalism in Belgium might be different from nationalism in Ukraine, but if we want to understand the current European crisis and how to overcome it we need to take both into account. The debate series "Europe talks to Europe" is an attempt to turn European intellectual debate into a two-way street. [more]

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Multimedia section including videos of past Eurozine conferences in Vilnius (2009) and Sibiu (2007). [more]

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