Krystian Woznicki

Central organizing principles such as “community” have been redefined by globalization, notes Krystian Woznicki. Art faces the question of the representability of community ­ or rather, its unrepresentability. The latter includes the community of the excluded. Referring to photographs by Bruno Serralongue, Woznicki suggests that the excluded are best represented as zombies: they appear as a community that wants to force its way into society. Their goals are unclear.

Only in en

Multilingualism campaigns aiming at lingual diversity on the Internet create a basis for putting a language online but do not manage to reflect upon what kind of environment the Internet, apart from its uniformity, really represents for the respective language and its development.

The blogging movement’s claim to empower the “netizen” is being undermined from two sides. As blogging becomes more and more fashionable, commercial considerations start to come foremost. On the other hand, some of today’s most successful blogs are written and read by a media elite. The concept of citizen journalism needs to be re-thought in the light of these developments, writes Krystian Woznicki.

With the spread of the Internet, the utopia was given a location in cyberspace. It was now a question of exploring, surveying, and settling this new continent. Those who departed for it dreamed the dream of a better world. In its immaterial expanses, new social models could be tested and new forms of life practised. Capitalism, racism, and all the other evils of the material world would be overcome. And what is more: it was not only the perfect counter-world, but also represented the next world order. Linked-up, decentralized, without hierarchies. This dream was of course also based on a new image of humankind.