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Nafeez Ahmed

Safeguarding the "grey zone"

For free, open and diverse societies

In an article first published shortly after the 13 November Paris terrorist attacks, investigative journalist Nafeez Ahmed addresses the twisted logic of extremist ideologies; and how to break the continuum of violence that such ideologies seek to perpetuate. [ more ]

Valeria Korablyova

Pariahs and parvenus?

Ulrike Guérot

Europe as a republic

Hal Foster, John Douglas Millar

After the canon?

Robert Menasse

A brief history of the European future

New Issues


Osteuropa | 5-6/2015

Zeichen der Zeit. Europas Osten in Fernost [Signs of the times. Europe's East in Far East]

Poeteka | 36 (2015)

Now and again we dream of Europe

Host | 8/2015

Eurozine Review

Eurozine Review

Of technological waves and political frontiers

"Wespennest" refuses to let the machines takeover; "Letras Libres" sees citizen power as the key to a post-national European democracy; "Soundings" strikes out for a new political frontier in British politics; "Il Mulino" traces the shifting contours of the European debate on sovereignty; "Blätter" seeks ways out of the Catalan impasse; "New Eastern Europe" appeals to Europe's goodwill and openness amid refugee crisis; "Arena" reaffirms the Swedish people's overwhelming support for a humanitarian refugee policy; "Merkur" traverses the analogue-digital divide; and "Esprit" samples the paranoid style in the digital age.

Eurozine Review

Beyond imagination or control

Eurozine Review

What animates us?

Eurozine Review

If the borders were porous

Eurozine Review

That which one does not entirely possess

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Articles published in Eurozine

Nafeez Ahmed

Safeguarding the "grey zone"

For free, open and diverse societies

In an article first published shortly after the 13 November Paris terrorist attacks, investigative journalist Nafeez Ahmed addresses the twisted logic of extremist ideologies; and how to break the continuum of violence that such ideologies seek to perpetuate. [more]


Michal Simecka, Benjamin Tallis

Fighting the wrong battle

A crisis of liberal democracy, not migration

The hostile response of central and eastern European heads of state to the prospect of accepting Syrian refugees is emblematic of the parlous state of liberal democracy in the region, say Michal Simecka and Benjamin Tallis. Europe must avert a deepening East-West divide. [more]


Étienne Balibar, Sandro Mezzadra, Frieder Otto Wolf

The Brussels diktat

It may well be that the Euro-Summit agreement of 12 July 2015 is forced through in a process at least as brutal, and even more divisive, than the extremities of the eurocrisis seen over the last five years. But even this does not necessarily preclude the renewal of European politics. [more]


Ulrike Guérot

Europe as a republic

The story of Europe in the twenty-first century

The system currently known as the European Union is the embodiment of post-democracy, says Ulrike Guérot. The solution: to turn Europe on its head. For the Europe of tomorrow is a European Republic, the embodiment of a transnational community. [Catalan version added] [more]


Cathryn Costello, Mariagiulia Giuffré

"Tragedy" and responsibility in the Mediterranean

The European Union plans to use costly military operations to suppress refugee mobility, write Mariagiulia Giuffré and Cathryn Costello. This means, in short, responding to those fleeing war, repression and human rights abuses with more of the same. So what are the alternatives? [more]


Bill Frelick, Judith Sunderland

Humanitarian rhetoric, inhumane treatment

The European Union's approach to migrants

In an article first published prior to the 19 April capsizing of a wooden fishing boat and consequent drowning of around 800 migrants in the Mediterranean, Judith Sunderland and Bill Frelick warn about the EU's preference for border enforcement over the creation of safe, legal channels into the EU. [more]


Thomas Fazi

The troika saved banks and creditors – not Greece

Greece deserves debt relief, says Thomas Fazi. After all, most bail out money went to banks and creditors, which irrefutably puts to shame the claim that European taxpayers' money was used to save Greece and the other reckless countries of the periphery. [more]


Anne Marie Goetz

Preventing violence against women

International solidarities

Nothing short of dramatic social transformation can eliminate the legal, economic and political basis for cults of gender difference and male privilege; and thus end the violence. So says Anne Marie Goetz, arguing that international solidarities are of crucial importance to the struggle. [more]


Cynthia Cockburn

Call of duty, or call for change?

On masculine violence

Endemic male violence against women, and the militarization of the dominant form of masculinity in our culture: surely these things are not unrelated, writes London-based feminist writer and researcher Cynthia Cockburn. A plea for a culture of equality, co-operation and peace. [more]


Nikolay Nikolov

Without a façade to hide behind

Lessons from Bulgaria

The longest anti-government protest in Bulgarian history brought about the resignation of Plamen Oresharski's cabinet in July. But where does the political process go from here? Nikolay Nikolov remains optimistic about the outcome of the country's tormented transition to democracy. [more]


Timothy Cooper

Arab migrants face a new Sykes-Picot in Calais

Afghan Jungle, Hazara Jungle, Palestine House. Calais' squats and camps have existed in various incarnations for years: the result of two European nations fortifying themselves against crises of their own making, writes Timothy Cooper. History continues to repeat itself. [more]


Mary Kaldor

The habits of the heart

Substantive democracy after the European elections

Only a mixture of bottom-up and top-down measures can avoid a nationalist cycle of disintegration now, argues Mary Kaldor. This means opening up the public sphere, especially at local and transnational levels, at the same time as creating a framework for a civilizing globalization. [more]


Jef Huysmans, Amandine Scherrer

The European Union's fight for digital rights

The EU's response to the NSA scandal, a recent landmark European Court of Justice ruling and the European Parliament's rejection of ACTA: all developments, argue Amandine Scherrer and Jef Huysmans, that show the EU remains key to achieving an Internet commons. [more]


Peter Dauvergne, Genevieve LeBaron

Corporatizing activism

Corporatization is transforming what activists and NGOs conceive of as being realistic and possible in terms of desirable change. Genevieve LeBaron and Peter Dauvergne examine recent trends that raise crucial issues about the future of global citizen action. [more]


Eldar Sarajlic

The perils of procedural democracy

A lesson from Bosnia

At the beginning of February, violent protests swept through Bosnia-Herzegovina: demonstrators clashed with police and government buildings were set ablaze. But then, independent citizens' assemblies began to be organized to formulate demands to be made to the government. [more]


Eve Geddie

Changing the European discourse on migration

Increased securitization and discrimination against migrants has neither reinforced the freedom, security and well-being of EU citizens nor curbed irregular migration, writes Eve Geddie. It's time to change the European discourse on undocumented migrants. [more]


Dawn Foster

Women in journalism: Not a trivial subject

Plenty of women are working as correspondents and reporters, but relatively few as opinion writers and editors. And while the gender gap in print is insidious, in broadcast media it's glaringly obvious, writes Dawn Foster. Meanwhile, the gentrification of the media continues apace. [more]


Claudia Ciobanu

The revolution begins with Rosia Montana

The prospect of Romania's parliament passing new legislation, allowing the expropriation of citizens' homes to make way for Europe's largest gold mine, has prompted some of the country's most significant protests since the fall of communism. Claudia Ciobanu reports. [more]


Peter Pomerantsev

Sometimes we dream of Europe

Until 1991, Ukraine had largely failed to establish a narrative for itself in the world. Peter Pomerantsev shows how, thereafter, a new literature emerged that made contemporary Ukrainian writers Europe's grittier Latin Americans, mixing magical realism with domestic abuse, folklore and mafia. [more]


Sergey Khazov

Rainbow Russia

Though homosexuality was decriminalized in Russia in 1993, an increasingly restrictive legal climate and widespread intolerance continue to hamper the lives of gay men and women. Nonetheless, LGBT networks continue to develop support systems of their own. [more]


Sergey Khazov

A different childhood

In an unpublished, semi-autobiographical novel, Sergey Khazov draws on his experience of growing up gay in Russia. Extracts. [more]


Ivan Krastev

Is China more democratic than Russia?

Power rotation, listening to the people, tolerance of dissent, recruitment of elites and experimentation: the truth is that, in all of these respects, China is more democratic than Russia. And China's decision making is undoubtedly superior too, argues Ivan Krastev. [more]


Stephen Hopgood

Human Rights: Past their sell-by date

If the concept of global human rights is to endure, a new and more political, transnational and adaptable movement must emerge, argues Stephen Hopgood. Only then might bottom-up democratic norms replace top-down authoritative rules. [more]


Kerem Öktem

Turkey, from Tahrir to Taksim

Kerem Öktem explains why the occupation of Gezi Park in Istanbul's Taksim Square quickly turned into an enormous eruption of protest; the key factors being increasingly uninhibited neoliberal development, the government's conservative zeal and a troubled foreign policy. [more]


Paul Rogers

Woolwich and Afghanistan: The connection

Professor of peace studies Paul Rogers insists that there is a connection between the shocking murder of a young soldier on a London street and "remote-control" attacks by western states. It's crucial to recognize this if we are to avoid such extreme violence in the future. [more]


Constantine Dimoulas, Vassilis K. Fouskas

Cyprus crisis: Swan song of the Eurozone

Fouskas and Dimoulas look at the bigger picture surrounding the Greek Cypriot crisis, as economic contraction reaches levels not seen since the Turkish invasion. Meanwhile, external economic and geopolitical interests leave little prospect of European politics furthering the cause of integration. [more]


Dimitar Bechev

Bulgaria's anger: The real source

As the Bulgarian post-communist transition faces its moment of crisis and the government resigns, the political class and the economic model it oversaw are the subject of deep dissatisfaction. Dimitar Bechev outlines what went wrong, and what can be expected of Bulgaria's spring of anger. [more]


Marina Akhmedova

Snap goes the crocodile

Marina Akhmedova spent four days in the company of drug users in Yekaterinburg, Russia, and was met with a picture of desperation, punctured by love, humanity and misplaced hope. Shortly after it was published, this harrowing piece of reportage journalism was banned in Russia. [more]


Antony Lerman

Günter Grass, antisemitism and the inflation of evil

Denunciation of Günter Grass's poem "What must be said" typifies a fundamentalist understanding of antisemitism that operates outside the realm of fact, argues Antony Lerman. If the poem is so heinous, what response would ever be appropriate to genuine antisemitism? [more]


Ali Rattansi

From multiculturalism to interculturalism

The British Conservative Party's alternative to "state-sponsored multiculturalism" encourages community activities promoting "mainstream values". Ali Rattansi sees the initiative as the latest in a series of attempts across Europe to blame multiculturalist policies for social fracture. [more]


José Ignacio Torreblanca

Democracy put to the test

While democracy evaporates on a national level, it doesn't reappear anywhere else, least of all in Europe. Maintaining the democratic nature of our societies depends on the rules of the game we impose on ourselves at the European level, argues José Ignacio Torreblanca. [more]


Roger Scruton

Unreal estate

Freemarket disregard for the elementary moral truths of debt and obligation is to blame for the current crisis, says Roger Scruton. But the call for a return to economic morality is no endorsement of the financial fictions of the social democratic state. [more]


José Ignacio Torreblanca

Five reasons why Europe is cracking up

Can Europe really break apart? Yes, of course it can, writes José Ignacio Torreblanca. Few times in the past has the European project been so questioned and its disgraces so publicly exposed as now. It's time to stop looking the other way. [more]


Markha Valenta

Multiculturalism and the politics of bad memories

Behind the recent attacks on multiculturalism is a false memory of stability disrupted by the arrival of people of other cultures, writes Markha Valenta. A row over the absence of non-white characters in the detective series "Midsomer Murders" says a lot about our idea of "home". [more]


Cécile Laborde

Which "multiculturalism" has failed, David Cameron?

The multiculturalism recently attacked by David Cameron bears little in common with the integration policies of previous British governments, writes Cécile Laborde. What it does resemble is a securitization approach that places citizens under suspicion on the basis of their religion. [more]


Tjebbe van Tijen

Scapegoater hunted down as a witch

Geert Wilders and the Dutch press

Judgmental journalism directed at members of parliament is an orchestrated form of "mob-justice" in the Netherlands today. Self-appointed media watchdogs present a bigger danger to society than the persons they pursue, writes Tjebbe van Tijen. [more]


Cas Mudde

The intolerance of the tolerant

The advance of populist anti-Islamic forces in the liberal bastions of northern Europe -- Denmark, the Netherlands and Sweden -- appears to reflect a betrayal of these societies' renowned social tolerance. But there is a more subtle logic at work, says Cas Mudde. [more]


Florian Bieber

Foam on the tide of time: The ICJ ruling on Kosovo

The International Court of Justice ruling on Kosovan independence will not herald a sea-change in Serbian public opinion, but it is likely to facilitate a coming-to-terms with the fact that Kosovo is "lost", writes Florian Bieber. The much-feared domino effect is also unlikely to occur. [more]


Jeremy Gilbert

Elitism, philistinism and populism

The sorry tale of British higher education policy

With government pressure increasing to make employability the sole goal of higher education in all but the elite institutions, universities in the UK will soon be providing no more than tertiary training for the service, retail and media industries, writes Jeremy Gilbert. [more]


Mikhail Khodorkovsky, Lyudmila Ulitskaya

"The most important thing here is self-discipline..."

The Khodorkovsky-Ulitskaya correspondence

"Looking for loopholes in the law and exploiting them - this was the most that we allowed ourselves. And we got our kicks from showing the government the mistakes it had made in legislation." Mikhail Khodorkovsky confides in novelist Lyudmila Ulitskaya. [more]


Simon Zadek

Plan B on climate: National deals

There is near universal consensus that a multilateral treaty is the only way to reduce global carbon emissions. Yet experience shows that deals focused on top-down mechanics fail. Unilateral action based on national self-interest is the only hope [more]


Arseni Roginski

Fragmented memory

Stalin and Stalinism in present-day Russia

As contemporary witnesses disappear, collective memory in Russia is altering, writes the director of Memorial. The hardships of war and the Stalinist terror are being forgotten and Stalin is being remembered as the victor over the essence of evil. [more]



Focal points     click for more

The politics of privacy
The Snowden leaks and the ensuing NSA scandal made the whole world debate privacy and data protection. Now the discussion has entered a new phase - and it's all about policy. A focal point on the politics of privacy: claiming a European value. [more]

Beyond Fortress Europe
The fate of migrants attempting to enter Fortress Europe has triggered a new European debate on laws, borders and human rights. A focal point featuring reportage alongside articles on policy and memory. With contributions by Fabrizio Gatti, Seyla Benhabib and Alessandro Leogrande. [more]

Russia in global dialogue
In the two decades after the end of the Cold War, intellectual interaction between Russia and Europe has intensified. It has not, however, prompted a common conversation. The focal point "Russia in global dialogue" seeks to fuel debate on democracy, society and the legacy of empire. [more]

Ukraine in focus
Ten years after the Orange Revolution, Ukraine is in the throes of yet another major struggle. Eurozine provides commentary on events as they unfold and further articles from the archive providing background to the situation in today's Ukraine. [more]

Eurozine BLOG

On the Eurozine BLOG, editors and Eurozine contributors comment on current affairs and events. What's behind the headlines in the world of European intellectual journals?
Victor Tsilonis
Greek bailout referendum, Euro Summit, Germope
Victor Tsilonis of "Intellectum" (Greece) comments on recent developments in the Greek crisis: the short-lived euphoria of the 5 July referendum, Alexis Tsipras's subsequent "mental waterboarding", and the outlook for a German-led Europe. [more]

Time to Talk     click for more

Time to Talk, a network of European Houses of Debate, has partnered up with Eurozine to launch an online platform. Here you can watch video highlights from all TTT events, anytime, anywhere.
Neda Deneva, Constantina Kouneva, Irina Nedeva and Yavor Siderov
Does migration intensify distrust in institutions?
How do migration and institutional mistrust relate to one another? As a new wave of populism feeds on and promotes fears of migration, aggrandising itself through the distrust it sows, The Red House hosts a timely debate with a view to untangling the key issues. [more]

Support Eurozine     click for more

If you appreciate Eurozine's work and would like to support our contribution to the establishment of a European public sphere, see information about making a donation.

Vacancies at Eurozine     click for more

There are currently no positions available.

Editor's choice     click for more

Timothy Snyder
Europe and Ukraine: Past and future
The history of Ukraine has revealed the turning points in the history of Europe. Prior to Ukraine's presidential elections in May 2014, Timothy Snyder argued cogently as to why Ukraine has no future without Europe; and why Europe too has no future without Ukraine. [more]

Literature     click for more

Karl Ove Knausgård
Out to where storytelling does not reach
To write is to write one's way through the preconceived and into the world on the other side, to see the world as children can, as fantastic or terrifying, but always rich and wide-open. Karl Ove Knausgård on creating literature. [more]

Jonathan Bousfield
Growing up in Kundera's Central Europe
Jonathan Bousfield talks to three award-winning novelists who spent their formative years in a Central Europe that Milan Kundera once described as the kidnapped West. It transpires that small nations may still be the bearers of important truths. [more]

Literary perspectives
The re-transnationalization of literary criticism
Eurozine's series of essays aims to provide an overview of diverse literary landscapes in Europe. Covered so far: Croatia, Sweden, Austria, Estonia, Ukraine, Northern Ireland, Slovenia, the Netherlands and Hungary. [more]

Debate series     click for more

Europe talks to Europe
Nationalism in Belgium might be different from nationalism in Ukraine, but if we want to understand the current European crisis and how to overcome it we need to take both into account. The debate series "Europe talks to Europe" is an attempt to turn European intellectual debate into a two-way street. [more]

Conferences     click for more

Eurozine emerged from an informal network dating back to 1983. Since then, European cultural magazines have met annually in European cities to exchange ideas and experiences. Around 100 journals from almost every European country are now regularly involved in these meetings.
Law and Border. House Search in Fortress Europe
The 26th European Meeting of Cultural Journals
Conversano, 3-6 October 2014
Eurozine's 2014 conference in southern Italy, not far from Lampedusa, addressed both EU refugee and immigration policies and intellectual partnerships across the Mediterranean. Speakers included Italian investigative journalist Fabrizio Gatti and Moroccan feminist and Nobel Peace Prize nominee Rita El Khayat. [more]

Multimedia     click for more
Multimedia section including videos of past Eurozine conferences in Vilnius (2009) and Sibiu (2007). [more]

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