Latest Articles


06.03.2015
Paul Mason

Who is Eleni Haifa?

On information technology and human character

Virginia Woolf's famous line – "on or about December 1910, human character changed" – haunts the present. For sometime during the 2000s, writes Paul Mason, a combination of technology, broken economic life-chances and increased personal freedom changed human character all over again. [ more ]

03.03.2015
Filip Mazurczak

Poland's controversial Oscar

02.03.2015
Eurozine News Item

New Eurozine partner: Razpotja

27.02.2015
Peter Schaar

Privacy as a human right

27.02.2015
Alice Béja

The worst possible time for privacy

New Issues


06.03.2015

Merkur | 3/2015

06.03.2015

Osteuropa | 11-12/2014

Sehendes Auge. Europäische Gewaltgeschichten [Eyes wide open. European histories of violence]
25.02.2015

Razpotja | 18 (2014)

Spolnost [Sexuality]

Eurozine Review


25.02.2015
Eurozine Review

The right to blaspheme

In "Esprit", a Catholic philosopher defends the right to blaspheme after the Charlie Hebdo attack; "Dérive" visits the unique urban lab that is Germany's post-industrial Ruhr region; "Krytyka" notes the ascendancy of the Russian language in post-Maidan Ukraine; "Frakcija" eavesdrops ArtLeaks' discussion of art and money; "Multitudes" says the art market's rigged; "Letras Libres" celebrates the art of biography; "Mittelweg 36" immerses itself in the world of work; and "Razpotja" says sexualized society leaves much to be desired.

11.02.2015
Eurozine Review

Everything is falling down, now

28.01.2015
Eurozine Review

Dance mania and diplomatic parleying

14.01.2015
Eurozine Review

Massaging the writer's ego

10.12.2014
Eurozine Review

The way we let the young into the world



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Paul Mason

Who is Eleni Haifa?

On information technology and human character

Virginia Woolf's famous line – "on or about December 1910, human character changed" – haunts the present. For sometime during the 2000s, writes Paul Mason, a combination of technology, broken economic life-chances and increased personal freedom changed human character all over again. [more]

06.03.2015


Filip Mazurczak

Poland's controversial Oscar

Is "Ida" really anti-Polish and anti-Semitic?

Pawel Pawlikowski's film "Ida" may have won this year's Oscar for best foreign language film; however, it is far from universally well-received in Poland. While some fear it will resurrect anti-Polish stereotypes, others accuse it of anti-Semitism, writes Filip Mazurczak. [more]

03.03.2015


Eurozine News Item

New Eurozine partner: Razpotja

The Slovenian quarterly "Razpotja" has joined the Eurozine network. Established in 2010, "Razpotja" swiftly emerged as a leading platform for young thinkers and authors. The journal now provides a unique space for new cultural and intellectual encounters. [more]

02.03.2015


Peter Schaar

Privacy as a human right

Edward Snowden and the control of power

The Snowden revelations revealed just how far some states had departed from the guarantees of privacy enshrined in the human and civil rights agreements of the post-war era. The European Union must take the lead in setting enforceable data protection standards internationally, writes Peter Schaar. [more]

27.02.2015


Alice Béja

The worst possible time for privacy

Following the Charlie Hebdo attacks, French public opinion is firmly in favour of giving greater surveillance powers to the state. Measures focus on online radicalization, including outsourcing policing to service providers, writes Alice Béja of "Esprit". [more]

27.02.2015


Vicky Baker

Controversial anti-terror measures

The UK government tried to rush through a "Snoopers' Charter" after Paris and is playing the security card in the run-up to the May elections. Opposition is weakened by parochialism and complacency, writes Vicky Baker of "Index on Censorship". [more]

27.02.2015


Daniel Leisegang

Double standards prevail

In Germany there has been heavy public criticism of the NSA. Yet the German government has failed to investigate the affair and has been quick to demand greater surveillance powers after the Paris attacks, writes Daniel Leisegang of "Blätter". [more]

27.02.2015


Anna Wójcik

The Atlanticist consensus

Despite residual hostility to state surveillance, the Polish response to the NSA affair both at the political and public levels was strongly pro-American. Will campaigning be able to change mainstream indifference to privacy issues? Anna Wójcik of "Res Publica Nowa" reports. [more]

27.02.2015


Ann Väljataga

Digital optimism prevails

In Estonia, digital optimism combines with free market scepticism about the regulation of the Internet. As a result, privacy concerns have been sidelined, while the activities of the security services remain obscure, writes Ann Väljataga of "Vikerkaar". [more]

27.02.2015


Thomas Lemaigre

Liberalism under stress

The Belgian government has held back from demanding greater surveillance powers after the terrorist attacks; how long liberal protections withstand rightwing pressure remains to be seen, writes Thomas Lemaigre of "La Revue nouvelle". [more]

27.02.2015


Miljenka Buljevic

The failure of politics

Despite public interest, Croatian politics is too fractious and self-centred to engage in serious debate about state surveillance, while data protection and digital rights are concepts yet to enter the mainstream, writes Miljenka Buljevic of Booksa. [more]

27.02.2015


Beate Roessler

What is there to lose?

Privacy in offline and online friendships

Friendship enables us to relax the rules of privacy we need in other types of social relationship. When friendship goes online, however, controlling privacy becomes more problematic. Are social networks causing a change in friendship as such, and if so, should we be concerned? [more]

27.02.2015


Elke Rauth

Smart tales of the city

The smart city industry is continually conquering new terrain. But in the global rollout of the digital electricity and gas meter (smart meter), Elke Rauth discerns a project that shows disdain for the private sphere and puts the intelligence of governments and city-dwellers to the test. [more]

25.02.2015


Volodymyr Sklokin

Turning public

Historians and public intellectuals in post-Soviet Ukraine

As scholars, historians must discover the truth about the past, writes Volodymyr Sklokin. But following the Ukrainian intellectual community's transformation after 1991, Ukrainian historians have also begun to find their feet as intellectuals responsible for sustaining a public sphere. [more]

25.02.2015


Corina L. Apostol, Dmitry Vilensky

ArtLeaks: From intervention to infrastructure

ArtLeaks founders Corina Apostol and Dmitry Vilensky look to the future in terms of how the grassroots organization might best reveal and resist the toxic symptoms of neoliberalism in the cultural sector; not to mention create a better (art)world. The next step: joining forces with other international actors. [more]

25.02.2015


Klaas Voß

The year of maximum danger

On the Able Archer war scare of 1983

Klaas Voß finds that literature on the threat of nuclear war in 1983 reads like Thomas Pynchon's 1973 postmodern masterpiece "Gravity's Rainbow". So how much light can a historian now expect to shed on what may seem like a case of ignorant armies clashing by night? [more]

25.02.2015


Antoine Garapon

What happened to us?

The Paris terrorist attacks of 7 January mark a distinct departure from previous attacks against France, writes Antoine Garapon. They are particularly shocking due to the way in which the French citizens who carried out the killings targeted specific "enemies". [more]

25.02.2015


Eurozine Review

The right to blaspheme

In "Esprit", a Catholic philosopher defends the right to blaspheme after the Charlie Hebdo attack; "Dérive" visits the unique urban lab that is Germany's post-industrial Ruhr region; "Krytyka" notes the ascendancy of the Russian language in post-Maidan Ukraine; "Frakcija" eavesdrops ArtLeaks' discussion of art and money; "Multitudes" says the art market's rigged; "Letras Libres" celebrates the art of biography; "Mittelweg 36" immerses itself in the world of work; and "Razpotja" says sexualized society leaves much to be desired. [more]

25.02.2015


Michael Azar

Bridge over troubled waters

Swedish author and scholar Michael Azar weaves together a patchwork of narratives in which people matter just as much as the places in which they live; a practice that provides the key to the long overdue task of fashioning cities in accordance with human needs and hardships. [more]

20.02.2015


Arna Mackic

Immortal moments

A jump into the water

The reconstruction of deliberately destroyed public and religious buildings in Mostar has raised many questions and controversies. Arna Mackic searches for a new open architectural language to encourage encounters between people, liberated from the burden of politics or ethnicity. [more]

20.02.2015


Rania Sassine

Beirut's heart

The life of a square

Martyrs' Square once featured among Beirut's most dynamic civic spaces. However, 25 years after the end of the Lebanese Civil War, the city centre's reconstruction has all but cut the square adrift from civic life. Rania Sassine insists on its potential as a Lebanese laboratory of urban identity. [more]

20.02.2015


Joe McNamee

Net neutrality: Protecting digital rights

Connecting privacy with freedom of communication and information

The convergence of online policing with customer profiling and traffic filtering means that privacy needs to be seen in connection with freedom of communication and information. The principle of net neutrality combines this set of digital rights, explains Joe McNamee. [German version added] [more]

17.02.2015


Étienne Balibar

A new impulse – but for which Europe?

The triumph of the principle of competition among and within European member states has generated a continuous aggravation of disparities, writes Etienne Balibar. But the French philosopher stands by his vision of a Europe other than that of bankers, technocrats and political profiteers. [more]

11.02.2015


Eurozine Review

Everything is falling down, now

In "Glänta", Imogen Tyler deconstructs the asylum invasion complex; in "openDemocracy", Thomas Fazi insists the troika saved the banks and creditors, not Greece; in "Belgrade Journal", Étienne Balibar holds out hope for a new and plural Europe; "Blätter" examines the current craze for pinning everything on your enemy; "Dilema veche" speaks to Razvan Georgescu about how Romania traded Germans for money; "La Revue nouvelle" criticises the international justice system; "Springerin" looks back at 20 years of digital media culture; and "Varlik" remembers Osman Cetin Deniztekin. [more]

11.02.2015


Thomas Fazi

The troika saved banks and creditors – not Greece

Greece deserves debt relief. Of this much Thomas Fazi is convinced. After all, most of the bail out money has gone to banks and creditors, which irrefutably puts to shame the claim that European taxpayers' money was used to save Greece and the other reckless countries of the periphery. [more]

11.02.2015


Jazra Khaleed

The AEGEAN or the Anus of Death

Known as a boxer and poet, Jazra Khaleed draws a parallel between the two disciplines: his writing has the attack and punch of a fighter. The poem presented here, translated from Greek, concerns the fantastic world of undocumented migration between the 24th and 28th meridians. [more]

11.02.2015


Imogen Tyler

Welcome to Britain

Anti-immigrant populism and the asylum invasion complex

Imogen Tyler looks at how the manufacture of an asylum invasion complex within the public sphere aided the passing of UK legislation that reconstituted the refugee as a "national abject". That is, as a (likely bogus) asylum-seeker subject to destitution, detention and exclusion. [more]

11.02.2015


Albrecht von Lucke

Terror and Pegida

Even as counter-demonstrations begin to outnumber the participants in weekly Pegida marches, Albrecht von Lucke expresses alarm at the fragile political landscape that has allowed the movement to emerge. Prolonged social and political alienation has taken on an ugly new quality. [more]

11.02.2015


Konrad Becker, Josephine Berry Slater, Felix Stalder, Pauline van Mourik Broekman

Applied networks

A roundtable on 20 years of digital culture

It's easy to underestimate the time reserves and technical resources required to establish alternative networks. So wresting back the power that today's Internet giants wield will require investing serious thought in how to foster a social climate geared toward the success of such projects. [more]

11.02.2015


Eurozine News Item

New Editor-in-Chief of Eurozine

Wojciech Przybylski takes over after Carl Henrik Fredriksson

Wojciech Przybylski, who currently heads the prestigious Polish journal "Res Publica Nowa", is to succeed Carl Henrik Fredriksson as Eurozine's Editor-in-Chief. Fredriksson will leave his position on 31 March of this year. [more]

10.02.2015


Göran Dahlberg, Fabrizio Gatti, Linn Hansén

Camels don't pay in advance

A conversation with Fabrizio Gatti

Offering undocumented migrants the assistance that they need is well within the means of EU member states, says Fabrizio Gatti in interview. Instead, governments continue to bicker among themselves as to who is to pay and people continue to fall prey to the traffickers. [more]

06.02.2015


Peo Hansen

Undermining free movement

Migration in an age of austerity

How much longer can the European Union reasonably claim to guarantee the free movement of persons as a fundamental right? As the internalization of EU external migration policy starts to kick in, Peo Hansen examines the implications for the future of EU citizenship as we know it. [more]

06.02.2015


David Marcus, Roman Schmidt

Optimism of intellect

A conversation with David Marcus

Thanks to a new wave of small intellectual magazines, an infectious buzz has returned to public debate in the United States. Roman Schmidt talks to David Marcus who, as a new editor at "Dissent", is well placed to provide the lowdown what's driving this genuinely critical movement. [more]

30.01.2015


Maja Milatovic

"The love of women, kind as well as cruel"

Feminist alliances and contested spaces in Audre Lorde's "Zami: A new spelling of my name"

Audre Lorde's biomythography could not be more relevant to contemporary concerns about whiteness, forming feminist alliances across differences and intersectionality. Maja Milatovic celebrates Lorde's visionary text and the spaces it opens up for mutual recognition, dialogue and growth. [more]

28.01.2015


Anna Veronika Wendland

Fumbling in the dark

"Experts" on the Ukraine crisis: A polemic

It's not acceptable to reduce the war in eastern Ukraine to geopolitical over-simplifications and superficial accounts of local specificities, writes Anna Veronika Wendland. Yet German intellectuals and certain politicians on the Left continue to do so. The experts remain silent. [more]

28.01.2015


Glenda Sluga

Women at the Congress of Vienna

It's all too often disregarded: women's influence on the reorganization of Europe at the Congress of Vienna. Glenda Sluga sets the record straight, profiling the ambassadrices who assisted their husbands in soft democracy before it became part of modern international politics. [more]

28.01.2015


Eurozine Review

Dance mania and diplomatic parleying

"L'Homme" sets the historical record straight on women at the Congress of Vienna; "Soundings" speaks to Nancy Fraser about a new wave of feminism; "Genero" celebrates Audre Lorde's feminist biomythography; "Kultura Liberalna" discusses the fourth revolution with Adrian Wooldridge; "Osteuropa" slams the silence of German specialists on Russia's interference in eastern Ukraine; "Krytyka" notes the rise of Ukrainian historians as public intellectuals; and "Ord&Bild" explores the violence in never being seen for who you really are. [more]

28.01.2015


Lukasz Pawlowski, Adrian Wooldridge

Google cannot beat the state

A conversation with Adrian Wooldridge

His recent book characterizes the global race to reinvent the state as "The Fourth Revolution". Big corporations come and go, transnational institutions like the EU still alienate people. But the state will continue to adapt to the needs of today's world. So says Adrian Wooldridge. [more]

27.01.2015


Nancy Fraser, Jo Littler

An astonishing time of great boldness

On the politics of recognition and redistribution

Ideas tended to flow between the university and the movement during the era of second-wave feminism. Then feminism became academicized and disrupted the flow. But, says Nancy Fraser, given the hunger for new thinking in all arenas after the 2008 crash, this is changing once again. [more]

23.01.2015


George Blecher

Not bad for a lame duck

Much as the media like to call Barack Obama a "lame duck President", he's begun to look pretty agile of late. So says George Blecher. A portrait of Obama, the most consistent US president in decades, dispatched from inside the land of the free. [more]

21.01.2015


Eurozine News Item

War and peace in Ukraine

Public event

What has become of the hopes expressed by the protesters on the Maidan – joining Europe, restoring democracy, overcoming corruption? And what has become of the promises made by the West? One year on, on 19 January 2015, Kyiv Post editor Katya Gorchinskaya and Sweden's Ambassador to the OSCE Fredrik Löjdquist discuss the future of Ukraine -- and of Europe. [more]

15.01.2015


Stephen Velychenko

An open letter to Oliver Stone

In December 2014, the American film director Oliver Stone interviewed the former president of Ukraine, Viktor Yanukovych; and then argued that events on the Maidan last winter were the product of CIA involvement. Historian Stephen Velychenko responds. [more]

14.01.2015


Alice Béja, Marc-Olivier Padis, Thomas Piketty

Dynamics of inequality

A conversation with Thomas Piketty

At the heart of every great democratic revolution there was a fiscal revolution, argues Thomas Piketty. And the same will be true of the future. Only a global register of financial assets and a progressive global tax on capital can keep global wealth concentration under control. [Catalan version added] [more]

14.01.2015


Markus Beckedahl, Geraldine de Bastion

For a digital civil rights movement

The lobbying resources of large Internet corporations vastly outweigh the entire resources of organizations campaigning for digital civil rights. Much more must be done, argue Geraldine de Bastion and Markus Beckedahl, to avert the slide toward a new form of totalitarian state surveillance. [more]

14.01.2015


Michel Lussault

Space travels fast

Air travel and faster trains have slashed travelling times. But it's a fallacy to believe that space has been abolished, argues Michel Lussault. On the contrary, people simply tend to travel further and spatiality has never been more important. [more]

13.01.2015


Eurozine News Item

The critical spirit

Eurozine partners respond to the attack on Charlie Hebdo

On Wednesday 7 January, several of our colleagues were killed in an abominable attack on the editorial offices of the magazine "Charlie Hebdo" in Paris. Meanwhile, Eurozine partners have responded in various ways. [more]

13.01.2015


Kenan Malik

Je suis Charlie? It's a bit late

Had journalists and artists and political activists taken a more robust view on free speech over the past 20 years then we may never have come to this, writes Kenan Malik. After all, what nurtures the reactionaries, both within Muslim communities and outside it? It's this: the unwillingness of many so-called liberals to stand up for basic liberal principles, and their readiness to betray the progressives within minority communities. [more]

12.01.2015


John Crace

1215 and all that

Magna Carta, symbol of freedom

On 15 June 1215, King John cut a deal with the barons at Runnymede, near Windsor. 800 years later, the thirteenth century document known as the Magna Carta is of global significance where the nurturing of democratic ideals is concerned. John Crace explains why. [more]

09.01.2015


Janis Karklins, Wojciech Przybylski, Raul Rebane

Controlling the trolls

On Russia's information war

In a climate where the voices of genuine journalists risk being drowned out amid a plethora of agents of propaganda, what is the best media strategy for small states? Wojciech Przybylski leads a discussion on the robustness of media models in conditions of information warfare. [more]

09.01.2015


Eurozine News Item

The attack on Charlie Hebdo

Free speech, Islam and violence: from the archives and first reactions

Updated 13.01.2015 On Wednesday, several of our colleagues were killed in an abominable attack on the editorial offices of the magazine "Charlie Hebdo" in Paris. The shooting of at least twelve people was also an attack on one of the basic principles of an open society: the freedom of speech and expression. In such a situation there can be no buts and no perspectives. And yet, now more than ever, we need "slow journalism", we need reflection rather than reflexes. We recommend articles from the Eurozine archives that can help see the bigger picture and note the first reactions from our partner magazines. [more]

08.01.2015


Eurozine Editorial

Privacy politics today

We have entered a new phase of debate about privacy: about its sociological definition vis-ŕ-vis contemporary communications technologies; about its definition as a civil and consumer right; and about how it should be protected by laws and how those laws should be enforced. [more]

23.12.2014


Ramón Reichert

Back-end science

Facebook and big data research

Big-data analysis creates meta-knowledge based on an asymmetry of informational power, writes media scientist Ramón Reichert. Prognosis of collective behaviour has growing political status, as the social web becomes the most valuable data-source for governance and control. [more]

23.12.2014


Joe McNamee

Net neutrality: Protecting digital rights

Connecting privacy with freedom of communication and information

The convergence of online policing with customer profiling and traffic filtering means that privacy needs to be seen in connection with freedom of communication and information. The principle of net neutrality combines this set of digital rights, explains Joe McNamee. [German version added] [more]

17.02.2015


Ralf Bendrath

Trading away privacy

TTIP, TiSA and European data protection

The US is exerting heavy pressure on the EU to waive legislation placing restrictions on data-sharing with third countries. To abandon localized data protection arrangements in the EU would be to surrender fundamental rights to economic interest, argues Ralf Bendrath. [more]

19.12.2014


Elmar Altvater

Controlling the future

Edward Snowden and the Anthropocene

The worldwide spying operation is about more than security and counter-terrorism; rather, it is a part of a broader strategy aimed at controlling global information, writes political scientist Elmar Altvater. Opposition needs to grasp the geological significance of the planetary data theft. [more]

19.12.2014


Enda O'Doherty

The last chapter

Go out to your local bookshop, advises Enda O'Doherty, and get in close with those Books You Haven't Read, the Books To Read Next Summer and The Books To Fill Out Those Small Gaps That Are Still There On Your Shelves. Don't come away empty-handed. They may not be there forever. [more]

10.12.2014


Kaya Genç

In search of the 'New Turkey'

"The Old Turkey is behind us, and its doors are now closed", said Recep Tayyip Erdogan this summer, standing before a banner that read, "On the Road to the New Turkey". A month later he was president. And now? Kaya Genç wonders if two countries continue to live alongside one another. [more]

10.12.2014


Sebastian Conrad

The place of global history

Eurocentrism has necessarily given way to countless centrisms, the centrisms of the South being foremost among them, writes Sebastian Conrad. But while standpoint is everything, one must remain alert to the pitfalls posed by nativism and, equally, the commodification of difference. [more]

10.12.2014


Andrei Melville

King of the hill

On the stability and fragility of post-Soviet regimes

Over half the world's population still live not in democratically governed states but under authoritarian or hybrid regimes. Among which, argues Andrei Melville, the post-Soviet ones are in a class of their own. So what are the chances of a new wave of democracy breaking over these? [more]

09.12.2014


Eurozine Review

The way we let the young into the world

"openDemocracy" outlines how to end violence against women; "La Revue nouvelle" says Europe has let down its young big time; in "New Humanist", British author Philip Pullman slams cuts to arts education; "Dublin Review of Books" reviews the history of the book in 100 books; in "Merkur", Sebastian Conrad sees Eurocentrism replaced by the centrisms of the South; "Osteuropa" enters a brave new world of legitimate, authoritarian regimes; "Syn og Segn" struggles to comprehend the grave state of Russian art and politics; "Revista Crítica" revisits East Timor's failed postcolonial democracy; and "Kritika & Kontext" reveals how Solzhenitsyn made it in the West. [more]

10.12.2014


Cynthia Cockburn

Call of duty, or call for change?

On masculine violence

Endemic male violence against women, and the militarization of the dominant form of masculinity in our culture: surely these things are not unrelated, writes London-based feminist writer and researcher Cynthia Cockburn. A plea for a culture of equality, co-operation and peace. [more]

08.12.2014


Anne Marie Goetz

Preventing violence against women

International solidarities

Nothing short of dramatic social transformation can eliminate the legal, economic and political basis for cults of gender difference and male privilege; and thus end the violence. So says Anne Marie Goetz, arguing that international solidarities are of crucial importance to the struggle. [more]

08.12.2014


Kirill Rogov

Resource nationalism

Russia's anti-westernism and territorial revanchism have intensified. A case of deferred post-imperial syndrome linked to the collapse of the USSR? Maybe, says Kirill Rogov. But this alone hardly explains why associated policies are now apparently met with such widespread domestic popularity. [more]

05.12.2014


Giovanni Cocco, Rocco De Benedictis, Fabrizio Gatti, Massimo Sestini

Stories without borders

The Eurozine Gallery presents highlights from "Stories without borders", the exhibition series first displayed in Conversano, Italy to coincide with one of southern Italy's most important literary festivals, Lector in fabula, and Eurozine's 2014 conference, entitled "Law and Border: House search in Fortress Europe". [more]

03.12.2014


Eurozine News Item

Time to Talk: Highlights

Eurozine's sister site Time to Talk livestreams an English-language debate on the future of the State entitled "Work for all?", hosted by Eurozine partner and TTT member "Kultura Liberalna". Plus highlights from the 2014 Central European Forum. [more]

04.12.2014


Giovanni Cocco

Moving walls

Over the past 14 years, about 17,000 immigrants have perished in the Mediterranean, trying to overcome the material and virtual walls that surround the European Union today. That's 60 times the number of people who lost their lives attempting to cross the Berlin Wall in 28 years. [more]

03.12.2014


Renata Ferri

Felix's Diary

A journey in which there is no stereotypical marginality but that is full of humanity, balanced between the existential difficulty and the joy of living: this is the journey that viewers of Emiliano Mancuso's work embark upon, writes Renata Ferri. [more]

03.12.2014


Konstantin Skorkin

Luhansk: The case of a failed cultural revolution

In 2013, the seemingly hopeless task of bringing art to the provinces finally started to bear fruit in Luhansk, eastern Ukraine. One year on, the activists, artists, journalists and writers responsible are exiles in their own country, writes Konstantin Skorkin. [more]

01.12.2014


J.A. Tillmann

Monuments and other media

Recent controversy surrounding Budapest's proposed "Monument of Occupation" leads Hungarian philosopher J.A. Tillmann to reflect on perceptions of space and time in central Europe. And in how public space and national media are currently managed in Hungary. [more]

28.11.2014


Anna Wójcik

Culture challengers

Innovation in central and eastern Europe

The region is bustling with brilliant young minds in the world of arts and ideas. Anna Wójcik reports on a new project that profiles the most innovative among them: the culture challengers who, as the intelligentsia once did, pick up and run with the key transformational ideas of our times. [more]

28.11.2014


Bo Isenberg

Critique and crisis

Reinhart Koselleck's thesis of the genesis of modernity

The modern consciousness as crisis: Reinhart Koselleck's study of the origins of critique in the Enlightenment and its role in the revolutionary developments of the late eighteenth century is a work of historical hermeneutics whose relevance remains undiminished. [Russian version added] [more]

24.11.2014


Carl Henrik Fredriksson

Vienna has fallen!

The challenges of a European public sphere

How much in common must a community have? Quite a lot, says Eurozine's Carl Henrik Fredriksson. At the very least a common public sphere. Because without it, Europe's publics will be easy prey for those who know how to play the strings of history. [more]

21.11.2014


Franco Berardi

Media activism revisited

Although media activism has opened up new spaces of expression, it has not been able to prevent the dominant media to invade this freedom, writes Franco Berardi. Activists should therefore "reinvest the aesthetic dimension"; first as art, then as therapy. [Russian version added] [more]

20.11.2014


Rein Müllerson

Geopolitics dressed in the language of law and morals

The case of Ukraine

Reckless military interventions in other countries' affairs are becoming the norm globally. So what hope for international law? After all, argues Rein Müllerson, when it comes to bending and breaching international law, Russia has no lack of excellent examples to follow. [more]

19.11.2014


Eurozine Review

Another music! Or no music at all!

"Dilema veche" says Romania's new president had better lead the country out of the swamp; "Krytyka" invests its hopes for Ukraine in a new generation; in "Vikerkaar", Rein Müllerson says increasing western pressure on Russia is a mistake; "New Eastern Europe" takes stock of the Maidan one year on, and celebrates literary Krakow; "Blätter" publishes Jaron Lanier's 2014 Peace Prize speech; "Polar" considers debt not a curse but a blessing; "Arena" notes how a feminist party has changed Swedish politics; "Dérive" inspects the "safe city"; in "Kulturos barai", Sajay Samuel warns of the perils of checking your smartphone; and "Multitudes" scopes out the anthropo-scene. [more]

19.11.2014


Johanna Rolshoven

Open city calling!

The dominant public discourse on security, and associated legislative measures, can't be allowed to jeopardize the free movement of people and ideas that contributes so much to the unique atmosphere of urban spaces. Johanna Rolshoven makes the case for the open city. [more]

19.11.2014


Almantas Samalavicius, Sajay Samuel

Notes from a technoscape

A conversation with Sajay Samuel

Why is it that those in power cannot think outside the categories of economics and techno-science when faced with the spectre of widespread joblessness and natural disasters caused by an excessive reliance on techno-science? Sajay Samuel says it's time to stop and reflect. [more]

19.11.2014


Albrecht von Lucke

The spirit of '89

The democratic promise made on 9 November 1989, as the Berlin Wall fell, has never seemed further from being fulfilled globally than today. Albrecht von Lucke concludes that, tragically, it's as if the brutality of the Tiannanmen Square massacre on 4 June set the tone for what followed. [more]

19.11.2014


Mark Schieritz

Debt: Bring it on!

Follow the money

The nature of debt is often misunderstood, argues Mark Schieritz. Were the state to come to its senses and create the right kind of economic climate, there'd be less need for outrage á la Stéphane Hessel and more sensible opportunities to take on some conventional debt. [more]

18.11.2014


Ewa Lipska, Lukasz Wojtusik

A musician of words

A conversation with Polish poet Ewa Lipska

In interview, Krakow poet Ewa Lipska offers a rich portrait of her homeland's literary heritage: from fighting the communist regime, when books were everything and some poetry volumes had print runs of 10,000, to writing this year for the Polish rapper O.S.T.R. [more]

17.11.2014


Jan-Werner Müller

Europe's twin dangers

Normative disintegration, normative disengagement

Should anti-democratic populism continue to cast a shadow across the continent, Europe may well succumb to a creeping process of disintegration, warns Jan-Werner Müller. Now is the time for renewed political engagement, if Europe's democracies are not to start slowly corroding from within. [more]

14.11.2014


Aleida Assmann

Reflections on 1914/2014

A year of commemoration

Memories of World War I are being recycled, restaged and transformed for the future. And a common historical frame allowing European nations to remember their stories collectively is within reach: an opportunity we cannot afford to squander, writes Aleida Assmann. [more]

14.11.2014


Eurozine News Item

Livestreams from the European public sphere

Debates at the Central European Forum, Bratislava, 15-17 November

Commemorating the 25th anniversary of the Velvet Revolution, this year's Central European Forum addresses the entrenched polarization of societies across the former Eastern bloc and beyond. Plus catch up with coverage of "The vote against the EU: populism or protest?" [more]

12.11.2014


Eurozine News Item

26th European Meeting of Cultural Journals held in Italy

Conference report

The new European debate on laws, borders and human rights was the subject of this year's Eurozine conference, held in Conversano from 3 to 6 October, and co-organized by La Fondazione Giuseppe Di Vagno and Eurozine partner journal "Lettera internazionale". The conference gathered over 100 editors and intellectuals from all over Europe. [more]

05.11.2014


Stefan Jonsson

The first man

On the North, literature and colonialism

Nordic countries might not have a "classical" colonial past, writes Stefan Jonsson, yet a "northern colonialism" does exist. Any understanding of it must start with Nordic culture's view of nature and the myth of the "first man". [German version added] [more]

04.11.2014


Eurozine News Item

Literatur im Herbst 2014 looks to the North

7-9 November 2014, Theater Odeon, Vienna

The Literatur im Herbst festival 2014 takes place in Vienna from 7 to 9 November. Over three days, 14 authors read from their works and talk about the heroes, ideals and illusions associated with some of Europe's northernmost territories, the borders of which seem to shift ceaselessly. [more]

03.11.2014


Rosa Liksom

Finland, Lapland, Russia and me

The Tornio River forms the border between Sweden and Finland, and flows into the Gulf of Bothnia in the Baltic Sea. Throughout the ages, writes Rosa Liksom, the world's travellers have navigated the river with a view to finding out about the mystical North. [more]

29.10.2014


Eurozine Review

A centre receding

"Glänta" remaps migration; "Wespennest" heads north; "Mittelweg 36" engages in animal politics; in "Blätter" Marc Engelhardt slams the snail's pace of the Global North's response to Ebola; "Esprit" discerns the rehabilitation of the public sphere in Mediterranean youth uprisings; in "Letras Libres" Mark Lilla asks if there's a Plan B for non-democracies; "Res Publica Nowa" says that what Poland needs now is creativity; and "A2" finds the morphing of lit crit into advertising copy distasteful. [more]

29.10.2014


Svenja Ahlhaus

Animals in parliament?

Toward a new understanding of political representation

It's not so much that animals must have certain qualities to be capable of being represented, writes Svenja Ahlhaus. It's rather that their representatives must have certain capabilities and insights at their disposal in order to be able to represent animals at all. [more]

29.10.2014


Hugues Lagrange

Mediterranean youth uprisings

What unites recent uprisings on both sides of the Mediterranean is the profile of their actors: mostly young, educated middle class people. And perhaps for the first time in decades, they have been able to mobilize around the issues that matter to them, writes Hugues Lagrange. [more]

29.10.2014


Ulrich Brand

Degrowth: Birth of a movement?

Can the concept of degrowth really support the good life? Or will it remain a radical but politically inconsequential gesture of the ecolibertarian middle class? Political economist Ulrich Brand assesses whether or not the idea's time has come. [more]

29.10.2014


Agri Ismail

The pioneers of global gentrification

Does anyone feel genuinely at home in the age of global gentrification? Probably not, writes Agri Ismail, certainly not if the experience of the Kurdish diaspora is anything to go by. But so long as a Swedish song plays in an Irish pub in a chain hotel in Kurdistan, a sense of security remains. [more]

24.10.2014


Martha Nussbaum

Liberalism needs love

A conversation with Martha Nussbaum

A ban on the burqa in a country such as France, if applied consistently and without bias, would lead to bans on numerous practices in the majority culture, insists Martha Nussbaum. But while tolerance is essential, what liberalism really needs right now is love and compassion. [Spanish version added] [more]

23.10.2014


Alain Finkielkraut

Damn security!

A conversation with Alain Finkielkraut

There is no place for multiculturalism in France, says Alain Finkielkraut, let alone full-face veils; any concession that allows the Islamicization of Muslim-dominated neighbourhoods is a fatal mistake. What is required is a true and authentic, reflective and self-critical hospitality. [Spanish version added] [more]

23.10.2014


Nicole Gnesotto

There's no such thing as political globalization

How to explain the international explosion of tribal, mafia-style, dictatorial and terrorist violence? Nicole Gnesotto says it's down to the lack of "strategic globalization" on the political field, in sharp contrast to economic globalization's triumph. [more]

22.10.2014


Fréderic Neyrat

Critique of geo-constructivism

On the anthropocene and geoengineering

The geoengineer's promise of a brilliant future, where a technofix beats the threat of climate change, may seem appealing at first sight. But philosopher Fréderic Neyrat suspects that it will not end well for humans and proposes an alternative form of eco-analysis. [more]

22.10.2014


Eurozine News Item

Kultura Liberalna and Index on Censorship livestreams

Two debates organized by Eurozine partner journals will be livestreamed, including on Eurozine sister site Time to Talk. "Kultura Liberalna" debates youth unemployment in Europe and, to launch its autumn issue, "Index on Censorship" asks: will the future of journalism mean we are better informed? [more]

21.10.2014


Geert Lovink, César Rendueles

We do not prefer Facebook

A conversation with Spanish social critic César Rendueles

Let's not confuse contemporary social atomization with freedom as a complex project that requires some degree of cooperation and mutual support, says César Rendueles. And reject, once and for all, the technological ideology that extols cooperation and community building only when these are mediated by digital technologies. [more]

20.10.2014


Eurozine Review

This revolutionary moment

"Index" looks into the future of journalism; "Transit" keeps alive the memory of the Maidan; in "Syn og Segn", climate optimist Kristin Halvorsen calls for a global price tag on pollution; "Kulturos barai" talks to urban ecologist Warren Karlenzig; "Rigas Laiks" congratulates Reykjavik's first anarchist mayor; "Merkur" discusses photography and the definition of artistic value; "La Revue nouvelle" braces itself for more European political deadlock; "Kritiikki" profiles Russian émigré author Sergei Dovlatov; and "Nova Istra" remembers the Croatian émigré poet Viktor Vida. [more]

15.10.2014


Warren Karlenzig, Almantas Samalavicius

Winds of urban change

A conversation with Warren Karlenzig

From the rewilding of London's Upper Lea Valley to performance indicator software to manage 663 of China's largest cities, Warren Karlenzig knows more than most about urban sustainability projects. Yet he's never been as daunted as now by the unfathomable scale of today's cities. [more]

15.10.2014


 

Focal points     click for more

The politics of privacy

http://www.eurozine.com/comp/focalpoints/privacy.html
The Snowden leaks and the ensuing NSA scandal made the whole world debate privacy and data protection. Now the discussion has entered a new phase - and it's all about policy. A focal point on the politics of privacy: claiming a European value. [more]

Beyond Fortress Europe

http://www.eurozine.com/comp/focalpoints/lawborder.html
The fate of migrants attempting to enter Fortress Europe has triggered a new European debate on laws, borders and human rights. A focal point featuring reportage alongside articles on policy and memory. With contributions by Fabrizio Gatti, Seyla Benhabib and Alessandro Leogrande. [more]

Russia in global dialogue

http://www.eurozine.com/comp/focalpoints/eurocrisis.html
In the two decades after the end of the Cold War, intellectual interaction between Russia and Europe has intensified. It has not, however, prompted a common conversation. The focal point "Russia in global dialogue" seeks to fuel debate on democracy, society and the legacy of empire. [more]

Ukraine in focus

http://www.eurozine.com/comp/focalpoints/publicsphere.html
Ten years after the Orange Revolution, Ukraine is in the throes of yet another major struggle. Eurozine provides commentary on events as they unfold and further articles from the archive providing background to the situation in today's Ukraine. [more]

Eurozine BLOG

On the Eurozine BLOG, editors and Eurozine contributors comment on current affairs and events. What's behind the headlines in the world of European intellectual journals?
Eurozine
Eurozine Gallery: TIME top ten photos of 2014

http://www.eurozine.com/blog/
Massimo Sestini's aerial shot of a boat containing at least 500 people attempting to cross the Mediterranean Sea, included in the current exhibition in the Eurozine Gallery, has been named one of the top ten photos of 2014 by TIME magazine. [more]

CHeFred
A master of the daily grind

http://www.eurozine.com/blog/
On Sunday 30 November, Turkish publisher Osman Deniztekin died, just a few weeks after having been diagnosed with leukemia. He was 65. In memoriam. [more]

Time to Talk     click for more

Time to Talk, a network of European Houses of Debate, has partnered up with Eurozine to launch an online platform. Here you can watch video highlights from all TTT events, anytime, anywhere.
Dessislava Gavrilova, Jo Glanville et al.
The role of literature houses in protecting the space for free expression

http://www.eurozine.com/timetotalk/european-literature-houses-meeting-2014/
This summer, Time to Talk partner Free Word, London hosted a debate on the role that literature houses play in preserving freedom of expression both in Europe and globally. Should everyone get a place on the podium? Also those representing the political extremes? [more]

Support Eurozine     click for more

If you appreciate Eurozine's work and would like to support our contribution to the establishment of a European public sphere, see information about making a donation.

Vacancies at Eurozine     click for more

There are currently no positions available.

Editor's choice     click for more

Felix Stalder
Digital solidarity

http://www.eurozine.com/articles/2014-02-26-stalder-en.html
As the culture and institutions of the Gutenberg Galaxy wane, Felix Stalder looks to commons, assemblies, swarms and weak networks as a basis for remaking society in a more inclusive and diverse way. The aim being to expand autonomy and solidarity at the same time. [more]

Literature     click for more

Olga Tokarczuk
A finger pointing at the moon

http://www.eurozine.com/articles/2014-01-16-tokarczuk-en.html
Our language is our literary destiny, writes Olga Tokarczuk. And "minority" languages provide a special kind of sanctuary too, inaccessible to the rest of the world. But, there again, language is at its most powerful when it reaches beyond itself and starts to create an alternative world. [more]

Piotr Kiezun, Jaroslaw Kuisz
Literary perspectives special: Witold Gombrowicz

http://www.eurozine.com/articles/2013-08-16-kuisz-en.html
The recent publication of the private diary of Witold Gombrowicz provides unparalleled insight into the life of one of Poland's great twentieth-century novelists and dramatists. But this is not literature. Instead: here he is, completely naked. [more]

Literary perspectives
The re-transnationalization of literary criticism

http://www.eurozine.com/comp/literaryperspectives.html
Eurozine's series of essays aims to provide an overview of diverse literary landscapes in Europe. Covered so far: Croatia, Sweden, Austria, Estonia, Ukraine, Northern Ireland, Slovenia, the Netherlands and Hungary. [more]

Debate series     click for more

Europe talks to Europe

http://www.eurozine.com/comp/europetalkstoeurope.html
Nationalism in Belgium might be different from nationalism in Ukraine, but if we want to understand the current European crisis and how to overcome it we need to take both into account. The debate series "Europe talks to Europe" is an attempt to turn European intellectual debate into a two-way street. [more]

Conferences     click for more

Eurozine emerged from an informal network dating back to 1983. Since then, European cultural magazines have met annually in European cities to exchange ideas and experiences. Around 100 journals from almost every European country are now regularly involved in these meetings.
Law and Border. House Search in Fortress Europe
The 26th European Meeting of Cultural Journals
Conversano, 3-6 October 2014

http://www.eurozine.com/comp/conversano2014.html
Eurozine's 2014 conference in southern Italy, not far from Lampedusa, addressed both EU refugee and immigration policies and intellectual partnerships across the Mediterranean. Speakers included Italian investigative journalist Fabrizio Gatti and Moroccan feminist and Nobel Peace Prize nominee Rita El Khayat. [more]

Multimedia     click for more

http://www.eurozine.com/comp/multimedia.html
Multimedia section including videos of past Eurozine conferences in Vilnius (2009) and Sibiu (2007). [more]


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