Latest Articles


22.07.2016
Kate Brown

Dear Comrades! Chernobyl's mark on the Anthropocene

Authors writing about the Anthropocene and the Chernobyl disaster alike tend to slip into millennial scales and metaphysics. Historian Kate Brown suggests getting down to the particulars: the dates, facts and fate of people most directly confronted with the new radioactive reality. [ more ]

18.07.2016
Julián Casanova

The Spanish Civil War, 80 years after

18.07.2016
Birgit Aschmann

Spain's Transición

18.07.2016
Julia Macher

Pact of silence

13.07.2016
Eurozine Review

Critical junctures

Eurozine Review


13.07.2016
Eurozine Review

Critical junctures

"Index" warns of increasing threats to reporters worldwide; "Polar" discusses the paradoxical appeal of truth in an age of post-truth politics; "Esprit" is up all night on the Place de la République; "Il Mulino" condemns the cruelty of contemporary European politics; "Soundings" assesses the prospects for European solidarity post-Brexit; "Czas kultury" goes cycling; "Revista Crítica" dances to a contemporary tune, whether digitally downloaded or live at a festival; and "Ord&Bild" talks to Nobel laureate Svetlana Alexievich.

29.06.2016
Eurozine Review

The narrowest of margins

15.06.2016
Eurozine Review

Not looking closely enough

01.06.2016
Eurozine Review

Imperfect universalism

18.05.2016
Eurozine Review

Stand fast and hold firm



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Kate Brown

Dear Comrades! Chernobyl's mark on the Anthropocene

Authors writing about the Anthropocene and the Chernobyl disaster alike tend to slip into millennial scales and metaphysics. Historian Kate Brown suggests getting down to the particulars: the dates, facts and fate of people most directly confronted with the new radioactive reality. [more]

22.07.2016


Julián Casanova

The Spanish Civil War, 80 years after

During the early hours of 18 July 1936, Franco declared a state of war and his opposition to the Second Spanish Republic. In undermining the Republican government's ability to keep order, the ensuing coup d'état precipitated unprecedented open violence. Thus began the Spanish Civil War. [more]

18.07.2016


Birgit Aschmann

Spain's Transición

From Franco's dictatorship to democracy

It was once described as "perhaps the most successful transition from dictatorship to democracy that the world has ever witnessed". Hyperbole aside, Birgit Aschmann takes issue with viewing Spain's transition as an isolated event, to the neglect of key transnational factors. [more]

18.07.2016


Julia Macher

Pact of silence

Memory, politics and the Spanish Civil War

Today, Spain is as far from coming to terms with the events of the Spanish Civil War as with the ensuing dictatorship that only ended with Franco's death in 1975. Julia Macher outlines the resulting political divides and how they sustain the turbulence around post-Francoist democracy. [more]

18.07.2016


Eurozine Review

Critical junctures

"Index" warns of increasing threats to reporters worldwide; "Polar" discusses the paradoxical appeal of truth in an age of post-truth politics; "Esprit" is up all night on the Place de la République; "Il Mulino" condemns the cruelty of contemporary European politics; "Soundings" assesses the prospects for European solidarity post-Brexit; "Czas kultury" goes cycling; "Revista Crítica" dances to a contemporary tune, whether digitally downloaded or live at a festival; and "Ord&Bild" talks to Nobel laureate Svetlana Alexievich. [more]

13.07.2016


Véronique Nahoum-Grappe

Place de la République, 31-47 March 2016

On "Nuit debout"

The Place de la République in Paris has taken on a distinctive life of its own lately, driven not least by members of a generation with neither job nor housing security. Anthropologist Véronique Nahoum-Grappe presents her impressions of the Nuit debout movement. [more]

13.07.2016


Roberto Escobar

On the right side of history

Philosopher Roberto Escobar wonders at the extent of the indifference within Europe to the plight of people attempting to enter the continent in search of refuge. Could it be that we are letting politics become crueler, that we are closing our eyes, hiding behind our own indifference? [more]

13.07.2016


Peter Siller

Disputing the bigger picture

Why political parties are still decisive to democratic due process

Public intellectuals are growing too comfortable in their predictable condemnation of contemporary postdemocracy: where's the will to revitalize democracy, not to mention political representation itself? Peter Siller, co-editor of "Polar" (Germany), calls for a sea change in political criticism. [more]

12.07.2016


Michael Rustin

The crisis of neoliberalism in Europe

Prospects for European solidarity, post-Brexit

Europe has abandoned norms of equality and social solidarity in favour of market freedoms, writes Michael Rustin. But, following the outcome of the UK referendum, could the damage and disruption caused by the dominant neoliberal doctrines in the EU turn out to be reversible? [more]

11.07.2016


Claus Leggewie

Who is "the people"?

Participation between collective rage and constructive involvement

Current usage of the word "populist" in the German and European media is beginning to obscure the alarming rise of xenophobia and authoritarian tendencies across the continent. In the face of which, Claus Leggewie argues that it's high time for rhetorical anti-fascism to take a practical turn. This means meeting an urgent need for democratic participation to be extended beyond (but never used against) political parties and parliaments. [more]

08.07.2016


Seyla Benhabib

Critique of humanitarian reason

Never have there been more refugees in the world as today: an estimated 45 million in total. So what's the current relationship between international law, emancipatory politics and the rights of the rightless? Seyla Benhabib on the urgent need to create new political vistas. [Swedish version added] [more]

07.07.2016


Oleg Riabov, Tatiana Riabova

The decline of Gayropa?

How Russia intends to save the world

The Sochi winter Olympics are over but Russia's anti-gay laws remain. Tatiana Riabova and Oleg Riabov show how discourse in Russia brands "European sexual deviancy" a natural result of western democratic development; and Russia as the last bastion of "normalcy". [Swedish version added] [more]

05.07.2016


Matthias Streitz, Richard Tynan

Are ad-blockers killing the media?

Matthias Streitz, managing editor of "Spiegel Online" in Germany, argues that ad-blockers merely aggravate the current crisis in which the media finds itself; while Richard Tynan, technologist for Privacy International, insists that people have a right to protect themselves and their data. [more]

01.07.2016


Eurozine Review

The narrowest of margins

"Arena" contemplates the day in history that most changed the world; "La Revue nouvelle" explores issues of disability and citizenship; "Varlik" remembers Turkish women's rights activist Duygu Asena; "Razpotja" seeks to kick corruption out of public life; "Belgrade Journal" considers 11 July, day of commemoration of the Srebrenica genocide; "Host" devotes an issue to leading Polish writer Olga Tokarczuk; and "Merkur" catches up with Ai Weiwei. [more]

29.06.2016


Joëlle Berrewaerts, Vincent Fries, Marie-Martine Gernay, Dominique Goblet, Véronique Jacques, Michel Mercier, Christian Nile, Lucie Taquin

Disability, sexuality and citizenship

As confirmed by the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, clearly, people with disabilities are entitled to the same rights as anyone else. Yet the stigmatizing social representation of disabled people remains the key barrier to exercising these rights. [more]

29.06.2016


Matthias Dell

Ai Weiwei and the Euro 2016 football championships

Ever since Ai Weiwei's presence in Berlin became more permanent, he seems to have simultaneously lost his aura as a dissident Chinese artist and alienated the art world as a kind of arty, conformist Berliner. But conformism can cut both ways, writes Matthias Dell. [more]

29.06.2016


Eurozine News Item

After Brexit: Shock and disbelief

How the UK referendum result is being received across Europe

Will 23 June 2016 go down in history as having an equal but opposite impact to that of 9 November 1989? This is one of many questions that editors at Eurozine partner journals considered when asked about their initial responses to the Brexit decision, and its reception in their home countries. [more]

27.06.2016


Ivan Krastev

Utopian dreams beyond the border

If the financial crisis divided the EU between creditors and debtors, opening a gap between North and South, the refugee crisis re-opened the gap between East and West. What we witness today, writes Ivan Krastev, is not what Brussels describes as a lack of solidarity, but a clash of solidarities: national, ethnic and religious solidarity chafing against our obligations as human beings. [more]

24.06.2016


Matthew Kaminski

The day after Britain votes

Whether the UK remains an EU member or not, there's no business as usual to return to for Britain, the EU or even the western world. So says the executive editor of POLITICO's European edition, Matthew Kaminski. [more]

23.06.2016


Kenan Malik

Beyond the Brexit debate

Whatever the result of the UK referendum, neither popular disaffection with mainstream political institutions, nor the sense among large sections of the electorate of being politically voiceless, is likely to subside. Nor will it, argues Kenan Malik, until the reasons for that disaffection are directly addressed. [more]

23.06.2016


Ben Little

Labour's lost referendum

Ahead of Thursday's EU referendum, Ben Little of "Soundings" (UK) looks beyond the daily diet of questionable and competing facts circulated by party political factions, and considers the deep-seated tensions that currently shape the United Kingdom's fractured political landscape. [more]

21.06.2016


Benjamin Tallis

Fear and loathing in the UK

Both Remain and Leave campaigns are equally culpable for the toxic mixture of ill feeling and scare tactics that has defined the build up to Thursday's referendum, writes Benjamin Tallis. A British citizen who has spent most of his working life on the continent, Tallis bemoans how these dismal campaigns have obscured the fact that, for all its faults, the European Union remains the world's most successful liberal project. [more]

21.06.2016


Eurozine Review

Not looking closely enough

In "Blätter", Ulrike Guérot offers a corrective to European postdemocracy; "openDemocracy" founder Anthony Barnett states the case for "Bremain"; "Esprit" considers how to eat well and save the planet; "New Humanist" isn't exactly sold on cryonics; "Dziejaslou" dips into the correspondence of a Belarusian prisoner of conscience; "Fronesis" challenges the dominant ideology of capitalist (welfare) societies; and "Syn og Segn" on why a Muslim is not always a Muslim. [more]

15.06.2016


Ulrike Guérot

The failure of the political centre ground

The EU and the rise of right-wing populism

There is a no-man's-land between European post-democracy and national democracy that largely consists of grand coalitions of the political centre. It is here that European populism is flourishing and will continue to do so. Ulrike Guérot offers a corrective. [more]

15.06.2016


Hanna Bäckström, Johan Örestig, Erik Persson

The EU migrant debate as ideology

Social rights, obligations and responsibility in the capitalist welfare state

Public debate in Sweden on EU migrants has become particularly divisive of late, reinforcing misleading notions of who is considered "deserving" of welfare and who "non-deserving". The authors appeal for a political community based on radically different principles. [more]

15.06.2016


Lóránt Gyori, Péter Krekó

Don't ignore the Left!

Connections between Europe's radical Left and Russia

It's not just Europe's far right parties; the radical Left too has both personal and political connections to the Kremlin, write analysts Péter Krekó and Lóránt Gyori. Moreover, the old "comrade networks" of Soviet times remain active. [more]

14.06.2016


Steffen Vogel

Nuit debout: Renaissance of the French Left?

Amid the inner turmoil of France's socialists, Steffen Vogel asks: could the Nuit debout movement signal the renaissance of the French Left; or even a broader cultural turn altogether? Since emerging in Paris in early 2016, the movement was quick to go nationwide. [more]

13.06.2016


Erik Oddvar Eriksen, John Erik Fossum

Second-rate Europeans?

Lessons from the European Union's non-members

States such as Norway or Switzerland have tended to relinquish sovereignty to the European Union without any prospect of co-determining the course that the Union takes, write Erik O. Eriksen and John Erik Fossum. Such states are poorly prepared for new EU treaties and reforms. [more]

10.06.2016


Cal Flyn

Life after death

Once the preserve of eccentrics and cranks, cryonics is entering the mainstream. Is eternal life possible – or even desirable? Traversing the interface between transhumanist subcultures and high-stakes investment in novel technologies, Cal Flyn investigates. [more]

10.06.2016


Anthony Barnett

The European project and the case for Remain

Anthony Barnett, founder of "openDemocracy" (UK), argues for the United Kingdom remaining a European Union member state. In the process, he reflects on the changing prospects for a genuinely democratic Europe, and on the role of various new platforms in shaping European debate. [more]

09.06.2016


Maciej Kuziemski, Jan Zielonka

How the European Union inhibits integration

A conversation with Jan Zielonka

Today's EU is riddled with tensions and its founding ideals are endangered as never before. What's now required, says Jan Zielonka, is a form of European integration able to meet the needs of societies put under pressure by current geopolitical tensions and the digital revolution. [more]

09.06.2016


Christian Rémésy

Eating well and saving the planet

The globalized food industry has played havoc with ecological systems during the past 50 years. Christian Rémésy, of France's National Institute for Agricultural Research, insists that a much-needed food transition is possible; all that is lacking is political will. [more]

08.06.2016


Sergei Lebedev

Taking responsibility

Soviet crimes and Russian democracy

Russia's democratic movement needs to develop a cultural and political strategy based on the following premise, writes Sergey Lebedev: that a systemic failure to deal properly with Soviet-era crimes has engendered the present-day authoritarian Russian state. This is the only way to end the damaging series of half remedies that has so far sustained the illusion of justice being restored. [more]

07.06.2016


Garry Kasparov, Luka Lisjak Gabrijelcic

Preparing for change

A conversation with Garry Kasparov

Once considered a force of stability after the Yeltsin years, Vladimir Putin now depends on exporting instability and escalating international tensions in order to retain his grip on power at home. In the face of which, Garry Kasparov warns against complacency – at the same time as insisting that it is merely a question of time before Putin's apparent show of strength gives way to dramatic change in Russia itself. [more]

03.06.2016


Eurozine News Item

Eurozine at the Prague European Summit, 6-8 June

This year's Prague European Summit took place at the Lobkowicz Palace in Prague Castle. Topics up for discussion included the future of the Schengen Area; the implications of the UK referendum on EU membership, for both eurosceptic and mainstream pro-Europe political parties; and the likely impact of November's US presidential election on transatlantic relations. [more]

02.06.2016


Eurozine Review

Imperfect universalism

"New Eastern Europe" is well equipped for today's stormy international relations; "Vikerkaar" explores crises of political belonging in France and Europe at large; "NLO" analyses the class war in Russian universities; "pARTisan" considers the public profile of Polish theatre; "Mittelweg 36" lets rip over liberalism's silence; "Res Publica Nowa" revisits the Siege of Kobani; "NAQD" observes Maghreb societies in the throes of transition; and "Multitudes" calls for a kind of people's quantitative easing. [more]

01.06.2016


Regina Kreide

The silence of political liberalism

Political theory has remained disturbingly silent in the face of multiple global crises, writes Regina Kreide. Is the current extremity of political and economic circumstances simply inexplicable? Or do political theorists tend to look down on social reality from too great a philosophical height? [more]

31.05.2016


Yann Moulier Boutang

The euro and the question of monetary sovereignty

Without the single currency, says Yann Moulier Boutang, Europe really would have plunged into a 1930s-style depression by now. The solution to the eurozone's woes lies in a kind of "people's quantitative easing" used for social and public purposes, not just propping up financial institutions. [more]

30.05.2016


Seyla Benhabib

Critique of humanitarian reason

Never have there been more refugees in the world as today: an estimated 45 million in total. So what's the current relationship between international law, emancipatory politics and the rights of the rightless? Seyla Benhabib on the urgent need to create new political vistas. [Swedish version added] [more]

07.07.2016


Matteo Tacconi

Race to Rio still on for Ukraine's Paralympians

Despite cross-border conflict and domestic cuts in finance, the race to Rio is still on for Ukraine's Paralympians. Matteo Tacconi reports on the loss of the team's world class training centre in Yevpatoria, following Russia's annexation of Crimea, and on calls for the Ukrainian state to reconsider its budgetary decisions. [more]

25.05.2016


Martha Albertson Fineman, Mirjam Katzin

The human condition

A conversation with Martha Albertson Fineman

As privatization displaces a sense of civic responsibility on both sides of the Atlantic, care-workers become ever more isolated. Martha Albertson Fineman insists that, rather than the gender of the person doing the care work, it's the care work itself that simply isn't valued in today's society. [more]

24.05.2016


Camille Robcis, Aro Velmet

Universalist politics and its crises

A conversation with Camille Robcis

Human emancipation was always a more complex issue than it might at first seem, and never more so than in today's France. Camille Robcis discusses the evolution of French Republicanism since the 1980s in relation to controversies over same-sex marriage, integration and racism. [more]

24.05.2016


Robin Detje

Impertinence, beauty, opposition

Three journeys to the arts

Robin Detje casts a sceptical eye on headline events during the past year in the sphere of fine art, ranging from biennales in Venice and Istanbul to a podium discussion between Alexander Garcia Düttmann and Juliane Rebentisch in Berlin. [more]

20.05.2016


Matteo Tacconi

Izolyatsia, the Ukrainian cultural factory

Izolyatsia is a platform that promotes artistic and cultural initiatives. Its headquarters were in Donbas before war broke out, now they are in Kyiv. However, Izolyatsia's values remain the same: to guarantee freedom of expression. Matteo Tacconi reports. [more]

19.05.2016


Eurozine Review

Stand fast and hold firm

"Kultura Liberalna" speaks to Anne Applebaum; "Osteuropa" analyses Poland's conservative revolution; "Wespennest" devotes an issue to the charismatic hormone, testosterone; "Esprit" wonders what's next after western Middle East fatigue; "Arena" asks if art is important; "Merkur" listens to echoes of Victor Hugo; and "RozRazil" goes to the pub. [more]

18.05.2016


Tatiana Zhurzhenko

Capitalism, autocracy and political masculinities in Russia

The conflict over YUKOS, between Russia's two most powerful men at the time, became a turning point in post-Soviet Russian history, writes Tatiana Zhurzhenko. The expropriation of YUKOS opened the way to the annexation of Crimea a decade later; meanwhile, a new Russian masculinity was born. [more]

18.05.2016


Jan Koneffke

On Cicciolina, end-consumers and scrappers

Sexual morals and cultural change during Berlusconism

Author and publicist Jan Koneffke looks back on an era dominated by the testosterone-fuelled "buffone" figure of Silvio Berlusconi, tracing the myriad ways in which politics became entangled with porn, prostitutes and payments. But Matteo Renzi has scrapped all that now, hasn't he? [more]

18.05.2016


Hamit Bozarslan

Western "Middle East fatigue"

Amid its own economic and institutional crises, the strategically isolated West is simply unable or unwilling to understand Middle Eastern geopolitics, writes Hamit Bozarslan. But it remains an open question as to whether Russia's baleful intervention in Syria is a portent of things to come. [more]

18.05.2016


Ann Marie Utratel

No collaborative economy without commons

A report from Barcelona

Following the election of the city's new mayor Ada Colau in June 2015, Barcelona has reinvented itself amid a hive of social, cultural and political activism. Ann Marie Utratel explains how the city's transformation resonates with inspired efforts to realign collaborative economies with the commons paradigm. [more]

13.05.2016


Vitalie Sprinceana

The city belongs to all of us

Urban activism in Chisinau

Recent urban development in Moldova's capital city Chisinau is in many ways typical of other post-Soviet cities where aggressive privatization and the de-industrialization of urban economies have prompted the rise of social inequality. Sociologist and urban activist Vitalie Sprinceana describes how Chisinau's citizens and activists are rehabilitating urban space by forging new urban networks and creative communities. [more]

13.05.2016


Igor Stokfiszewski

Polish culture is turning barren

After 100 days in power, Poland's nationalist right-wing government expressed its desire to completely transform Polish culture. As the anticipated assault on the country's national culture gets underway, journalist and activist Igor Stokfiszewski of Krytyka Polityczna considers the threat that this blinkered approach poses to the vibrancy and diversity of grassroots cultural initiatives. [more]

13.05.2016


Konstantin Skorkin

Back to the USSR

The LGBT community in separatist Donbas

Before war broke out in eastern Ukraine, LGBT culture was reasonably well tolerated in the Donbas region. However, the situation changed dramatically for the worse after pro-Russian separatists gained the upper hand two years ago. Konstantin Skorkin reports. [Italian version added] [more]

12.05.2016


Thomas Docherty

Open-door policy?

On the erosion of academic freedom

Silence the speaker; divide and rule the audience. If that seems extreme, attack not what is said but its potentially upsetting or offensive "tone". Thomas Docherty reports on the insidious attempts of governments to inhibit academic freedom in the UK and internationally. [Russian version added] [more]

10.05.2016


Matteo Tacconi

The fate of displaced persons in Ukraine

War in Ukraine has caused about 1.5 million people to become internally displaced. Living conditions are often very difficult for those who flee the war zone in eastern Ukraine, writes Matteo Tacconi; however an informal network of NGOs does what it can to provide support. [more]

09.05.2016


Anne Applebaum, Lukasz Pawlowski

Populist seduction

A conversation with Anne Applebaum

Just because something can't work or doesn't work, doesn't mean people aren't going to try it, says journalist and Pulitzer Prize-winning author Anne Applebaum: just because it's a bad idea to break up Europe doesn't mean people won't want to try that too. [more]

09.05.2016


Carl Henrik Fredriksson

In a backyard that doesn't exist

How Russia has changed the European post-Cold War order

Carl Henrik Fredriksson considers the rather misguided notion that Russia under Vladimir Putin may have become a threat to security in Europe. In fact, Russia's contraventions of international treaties during the last decade render the very concept of European security null and void. [more]

06.05.2016


Alessandro Ludovico

Machine writing

From meta-knowledge to artificial intelligence

The latest machine writing may be more technologically heavy-handed than, say, the creation of "portmanteau words" in Lewis Carroll's "Through the Looking Glass". But some of the linguistic inventiveness generated by machines is no less enchanting, finds Alessandro Ludovico. [more]

04.05.2016


Eurozine Review

It's something new

"La Revue nouvelle" observes states of emergency in France and China; "Blätter" goes postcapitalist with Paul Mason; "dérive" discovers true heterotopia in the latest Austrian housing syndicates; "Kulturos barai" demands more public intellectuals who can write for and speak to a broader public; "L'Espill" discerns a sudden return of pragmatism to Catalan politics; "Poeteka" samples the textures of literary and Albanian history; and "Springerin" presents parallactic views of eastern European fine art. [more]

04.05.2016


Henry Giroux, Almantas Samalavicius

Higher education and neoliberal temptation

A conversation with Henry Giroux

If the university is to survive, faculty are going to have to rethink their roles as public intellectuals, connect their scholarship to broader social issues and learn how to write for and speak to a broader public. Of this much, the cultural critic Henry Giroux is convinced. [more]

04.05.2016


Elisabeth Ertl, Florian Humer

Do it yourself!

Solidarity and housing syndicates in Austria

Urban activists Elisabeth Ertl and Florian Humer examine the recent success of Austrian housing syndicates in securing genuine social equality, not to mention living and working conditions that are structured around modern, democratic standards. A report from Linz and Vienna. [more]

04.05.2016


Steffen Vogel

The nationalistic blockade

European Union in "polycrisis"

Following the EU-Turkey deal over the refugee crisis, Steffen Vogel calls for an end to national egoisms in Europe. Then a proper long-term, transnational solution might be found instead; a similar approach wouldn't go amiss in solving Greece's financial troubles either. [more]

04.05.2016


Jonas Campion

In a state of emergency

The case of France

The state of emergency declared after the November 2015 Paris attacks continues to apply today. Jonas Campion compares the current situation with previous instances in which the executive measure was enforced, from the "Algerian events" between 1955 and 1961, to civil unrest in 2005. [more]

04.05.2016


Matteo Tacconi

Remembering Chernobyl

30 years after

The National Chernobyl Museum in Kyiv documents the Chernobyl disaster and its legacy, including how one of the world's worst nuclear catastrophes became pivotal to the cause of Ukrainian independence. During his visit to the museum, Italian journalist Matteo Tacconi learns too of how the events of 1986 triggered a new anti-nuclear movement and a battle to access information suppressed by the Soviet regime. [more]

03.05.2016


Ulrike Guérot

Europe as a republic

The story of Europe in the twenty-first century

The system currently known as the European Union is the embodiment of post-democracy, says Ulrike Guérot. The solution: to turn Europe on its head. For the Europe of tomorrow is a European Republic, the embodiment of a transnational community. [Polish version added] [more]

02.05.2016


Patrick Bahners

A superfluous undertaking?

On the annotated edition of "Mein Kampf"

In January 2016, the Institute for Contemporary History in Munich published a new critical edition of "Mein Kampf", containing around 3,500 annotations. Patrick Bahners reports on the highly controversial debate surrounding the publication of a work banned by the Allies in 1945. [Norwegian version added] [more]

02.05.2016


Eurozine News Item

St. Petersburg Debate on Europe

Anna Akhmatova Literary and Memorial Museum, 15-18 May

Russia in Europe -- Russia and Europe is the title of the current Debate on Europe, taking place at the Anna Akhmatova Literary and Memorial Museum in Saint Petersburg from 15 to 18 May. The event is intended as a platform for communication about the forms and prospects of neighbourhood between Russia and Europe today. [more]

02.05.2016


Markian Kamysh, Myroslav Slaboshpytskyi

"Chernobyl should have been preserved as a cultural object"

A conversation with Myroslav Slaboshpytskyi

Ahead of the 30th anniversary of the Chernobyl disaster, celebrated Ukrainian director Myroslaw Slaboschpyzkyj talks about his past and forthcoming film projects relating to the Zone; as well as the clash of film-making cultures with which all today's directors must contend. [Italian version added] [more]

28.04.2016


Gisle Selnes, Alberto Toscano

Fanatical counter-histories

A conversation with Alberto Toscano

Liberal democracies are haunted by figures of radicalism, says philosopher Alberto Toscano. Moreover, as the associated policing of people is shadowed by a policing of language, the notion that all "extremisms" converge poses its own significant dangers. [Russian version added] [more]

28.04.2016


Mateusz Falkowski

Marching democracy

Throughout Europe, parliamentary politics has become increasingly intertwined with the politics of street protest, writes Mateusz Falkowski. And as recent events in Poland and Hungary show, a new dynamic of protest has emerged from the clash in central and eastern Europe between populist and liberal visions of democracy. [more]

28.04.2016


Agnieszka Wisniewska

Culture WITH people, not just FOR people!

Received notions of artistic and social practices belonging to separate spheres of society are fading away, writes Agnieszka Wiśniewska of Krytyka Polityczna (Poland). The commons is where cultural and social activists meet with the broader public and, together, create a genuinely participatory culture. [more]

26.04.2016


Eurozine Editorial

Creating the commons, together

Drawing on affinities between Eurozine's publishing activities and the European Cultural Foundation's Connected Action for the Commons programme, we launch a new focal point exploring the prospects for a commons where cultural and social activists meet with a broader public to create new ways of living together. [more]

26.04.2016


Jayne O. Ifekwunigwe

When commoning strategies travel

(In)visible cities, clandestine migrations and mobile commons

Commoning strategies are often improvised even in the liminal spaces that emerge in the cracks of Fortress Europe, says urban anthropologist Jayne O. Ifekwunigwe. In a text based on her September 2015 talk at the ECF's annual Idea Camp, Ifekwunigwe calls for a new commons that embraces both the mobile and the settled. [more]

26.04.2016


Charlie Tims

A rough guide to the commons

There are a raft of major challenges that complicate the creation of the commons today. The researcher and writer Charlie Tims considers some of the most pressing of these challenges -- in combination with landmark efforts to regain control over domestic and international modes of governance, as well as to reclaim resources, public space and housing. [more]

26.04.2016


Katarina Pavic

New models of governance of culture

Bottom-up cooperation between the independent cultural sector and domestic and European institutions can lead to both the decentralization of cultural production and the democratization of culture. So says Katarina Pavić of the Croatian cultural hub organization Culture 2 Commons. [more]

26.04.2016


Brigitte Kratzwald

The power to refuse

Commons and resistance

Commons are a form of resistance against self-exploitation, isolation and the reduction of people to consumers, writes Brigitte Kratzwald. But this resistance isn't about destroying what already exists: it's about creative production geared to meeting people's real needs. [English version added] [more]

26.04.2016


Matteo Tacconi

Media after Maidan

Students of journalism and journalists alike are determined to build upon the plurality of voices that came out of Maidan and were propelled into the media. But this is not necessarily to suggest that Maidan was the cradle of the new Ukrainian journalism. A reportage from Kyiv. [more]

22.04.2016


Markian Kamysh, Myroslav Slaboshpytskyi

"Chernobyl should have been preserved as a cultural object"

A conversation with Myroslav Slaboshpytskyi

Ahead of the 30th anniversary of the Chernobyl disaster, celebrated Ukrainian director Myroslaw Slaboschpyzkyj talks about his past and forthcoming film projects relating to the Zone; as well as the clash of film-making cultures with which all today's directors must contend. [Italian version added] [more]

28.04.2016


Olaf Haagensen

The barbarians are here

A letter from Lampedusa

A typical Mediterranean island, poor but charming – to the tourists, at least. At the same time though, Lampedusa is of course a symbol of the refugee crisis and a microcosm of the militarization of the Mediterranean. Fear and misconceptions abound in equal measure. Olaf Haagensen reports. [more]

20.04.2016


Eurozine Review

Leaping the boundaries

"Soundings" fashions new languages of solidarity; "Vagant" searches in vain for humanitarian corridors leading to Europe; "Ny Tid" says the essay is a way to political engagement; "Osteuropa" analyses state intervention as practiced in Russia and Hungary; "Merkur" is haunted by selfies picturing the German chancellor; "Index on Censorship" celebrates Shakespearean dissent; and "Letras Libres" traces parallels and disparities between Shakespeare and Cervantes. [more]

20.04.2016


Emil Aslan Souleimanov

A contested triangle

Russia, the West and "Islamic State"

Russia's intervention in the Syrian civil war toward the end of 2015 continued up until the partial ceasefire of February 2016. Emil Aslan Souleimanov interprets the move as an attempt to bring the West around to normalizing relations with Russia in the name of the struggle against IS. [more]

19.04.2016


Patrick Bahners

A superfluous undertaking?

On the annotated edition of "Mein Kampf"

In January 2016, the Institute for Contemporary History in Munich published a new critical edition of "Mein Kampf", containing around 3,500 annotations. Patrick Bahners reports on the highly controversial debate surrounding the publication of a work banned by the Allies in 1945. [Norwegian version added] [more]

02.05.2016


Preti Taneja

Star-crossed actors

When theatre makers in Kosovo and Serbia decided to put on an ambitious, dual-language production of "Romeo and Juliet" to tackle themes of feuding and reconciliation, Shakespeare scholar Preti Taneja travelled to see the top-secret rehearsals and premiere. [more]

18.04.2016


Kathleen McAfee

The politics of nature in the Anthropocene

In dialogue with Dipesh Chakrabarty, Kathleen McAfee considers the grounds on which a politics of broader solidarity can and must emerge in the face of an unprecedented ecological turning point; a turning point that is simultaneously a crisis of subsistence for billions of people, albeit to different degrees and in different ways. [more]

15.04.2016


Timothy J. LeCain

Heralding a new humanism

The radical implications of Chakrabarty's "Four theses"

The unnatural power of human society and technology has grown so great that it has, ironically, come full circle to become natural again, writes Timothy J. LeCain. Responding to Dipesh Chakrabarty's "Four theses", LeCain considers the resulting breach in what once seemed like an impregnable wall of separation between natural history and human history. [more]

15.04.2016


Roshi Naidoo

Strangers when we meet: Identity and solidarity

The urgency of global challenges like climate change and the need for collective action might be expected to reduce the importance of identity politics and questions of difference. And yet, writes Roshi Naidoo, it remains the case that there is no neutral conception of humanity for us all to belong to. [more]

13.04.2016


Adam Zagajewski

A defence of ardour

In honour of Adam Zagajewski receiving the Jean Améry Prize for European essay writing, we publish Zagajewski's defence of ardour. That is, true ardour, which doesn't divide but unifies; and leads neither to fanaticism nor to fundamentalism. [more]

11.04.2016


Volodymyr Yermolenko

Seven consequences of the Dutch referendum

A majority of almost two-thirds opposed the Association Agreement between the European Union and Ukraine in a referendum in the Netherlands on 6 April. As the public debate surrounding the referendum gained pace, the Ukrainian independent TV channel Hromadske became an important forum for associated discussion. Now that the results are in, Hromadske journalist Volodymyr Yermolenko assesses the implications for EU-Ukraine relations, and European politics in general. [more]

11.04.2016


Yustyna Kravchuk

Self-reflection through the visual

Notes on some Maidan documentaries

Today, the Maidan revolution lives on in a wealth of documentary films about the events of 2013-14 in Ukraine. Yustyna Kravchuk compares and contrasts the approaches of the films' creators, and the implications of these for the articulation of collective political desires. [more]

08.04.2016


Tatiana Zhurzhenko

Hybrid reconciliation

It seems that, subsequent to the "hybrid war" between Ukraine and Russia, reconciliation efforts have ensued – but only at first glance. In fact, what we witness is a continuation of war by other means, writes Tatiana Zhurzhenko. Mapping the growing alienation between the two nations, she asks: under what conditions is dialogue possible? [more]

08.04.2016


Timothy Snyder

Yes to security in Europe

Russia has adopted an open policy of dividing the European Union and undermining the security of its members, of which the Dutch referendum questioning the Association Agreement with Ukraine is but a small part. Timothy Snyder provides the background to the 6 April referendum. [more]

06.04.2016


Eurozine Review

Drastic measures

"Ord&Bild" digs up the pure gold hidden offshore; "openDemocracy" watches UK political system go into a nosedive amid EU referendum storm; "Kultura Liberalna" speaks to Dubravka Ugrešic; "Mittelweg 36" immerses itself in global migration history; "Il Mulino" calls for more cultural entrepreneurship; "Kulturos barai" analyses higher education and its discontents; and "Glänta" offers a whole range of alternative currencies. [more]

06.04.2016


Didier Fassin

From right to favour

The moral economy of asylum in contemporary society

The so-called European refugee crisis is revealing a situation rather than provoking it, says anthropologist and physician Didier Fassin. Without minimizing the problem, Fassin argues that it is crucial to understand the degree to which it is constructed as such by politicians and the media. [more]

06.04.2016


Emanuele Felice, Joel Mokyr

Creativity, technology and the state

A conversation with Joel Mokyr

History shows that a country may possess as much creativity and technological innovation as it is possible to have, but a restrictive state will kill off all potential resources, says Joel Mokyr. The economic historian and recipient of the 2015 Balzan Prize speaks to Emanuele Felice. [more]

06.04.2016


Jon Nixon, Almantas Samalavicius

Higher education and its discontents

A conversation with Jon Nixon

The audit culture resulting from neoliberal policies has had a deleterious effect on all sectors of society, and no less so on the universities, says higher education expert Jon Nixon. Clearly, the logic of austerity constitutes an existential threat to the great humanistic traditions of scholarship. [more]

06.04.2016


Eurozine News Item

New Eurozine partner: Ny Tid (Norway)

The Norwegian monthly "Ny Tid" has joined the Eurozine network. Through an international and critical lens, "Ny Tid" examines global conflicts, migration, surveillance and environmental issues. The publication's wide-ranging cultural section stands out for its sustained focus on documentary film. [more]

04.04.2016


Andrew Glencross

Who speaks for Europe?

The UK referendum as a pan-European affair

Intervening in the UK referendum debate is fraught with difficulty for EU actors, writes Andrew Glencross. This is not least because they are largely deprived of their most common rhetorical device: appealing to a normative commitment to European unity for the sake of continental peace. [more]

04.04.2016


Lukasz Pawlowski, Dubravka Ugrešic

The great theft

A conversation with Dubravka Ugresic

In a frank discussion with Kultura Liberalna's managing editor, the post-Yugoslav writer Dubravka Ugresic takes stock of European values a quarter of a century after the fall of the Berlin Wall. A lack of serious public forums, says Ugresic, has resulted in a lack of democratic thought. [more]

01.04.2016


Ulrike Guérot, Robert Menasse

Europe: The reconstruction of the Free World

A borderless Europe may seem like a distant prospect at the moment. But as struggles for universal access to the global commons beyond the nation-state intensify, it is bound to become a necessity, say Ulrike Guérot and Robert Menasse. [more]

30.03.2016


Zaven Babloyan

The Dutch referendum: A view from Ukraine

Ahead of the immanent referendum in the Netherlands on the Ukraine-European Union Association Agreement, publisher and translator Zaven Babloyan reflects on political misunderstandings, a lack of solidarity and literature as the last hope. [more]

30.03.2016


Eurozine Review

Unholy alliances

"Arena" takes stock of the Arab Spring five years on; "Belgrade Journal" critiques post-colonial tribalism in both Europe and Africa; "Free Speech Debate" considers how best to tackle dangerous speech; "Osteuropa" finds itself in Transcaucasia; "Esprit" analyses anger in contemporary Europe; "Res Publica Nowa" faces up to the threat of "demoncracy"; and "Letras Libres" celebrates Mario Vargas Llosa at 80. [more]

23.03.2016


 

Focal points     click for more

Ukraine in European dialogue

http://www.eurozine.com/comp/focalpoints/ukrainedialogue.html
Post-revolutionary Ukrainian society displays a unique mix of hope, enthusiasm, social creativity, collective trauma of war, radicalism and disillusionment. Two years after the country's uprising, the focal point "Ukraine in European dialogue" takes stock. [more]

Culture and the commons

http://www.eurozine.com/comp/focalpoints/culturecommons.html
Across Europe, citizens are engaging in new forms of cultural cooperation while developing alternative and participatory democratic practices. The commons is where cultural and social activists meet a broader public to create new ways of living together. [more]

2016 Jean Améry Prize collection

http://www.eurozine.com/comp/focalpoints/jeanameryprize2016.html
To coincide with the awarding of the 2016 Jean Améry Prize for European essay writing, Eurozine publishes essays by authors nominated for the prize, including by a representative selection of Eurozine partner journals. [more]

Ukraine: Beyond conflict stories

http://www.eurozine.com/comp/focalpoints/ukraine_beyond_conflict4.html
Follow the critical, informed and nuanced voices that counter the dominant discourse of crisis concerning Ukraine. A media exchange project linking Ukrainian independent media with "alternative" media in Germany, France, Spain, Italy and Greece. [more]

The politics of privacy

http://www.eurozine.com/comp/focalpoints/privacy.html
The Snowden leaks and the ensuing NSA scandal made the whole world debate privacy and data protection. Now the discussion has entered a new phase - and it's all about policy. A focal point on the politics of privacy: claiming a European value. [more]

Beyond Fortress Europe

http://www.eurozine.com/comp/focalpoints/lawborder.html
The fate of migrants attempting to enter Fortress Europe has triggered a new European debate on laws, borders and human rights. A focal point featuring reportage alongside articles on policy and memory. With contributions by Fabrizio Gatti, Seyla Benhabib and Alessandro Leogrande. [more]

Russia in global dialogue

http://www.eurozine.com/comp/focalpoints/eurocrisis.html
In the two decades after the end of the Cold War, intellectual interaction between Russia and Europe has intensified. It has not, however, prompted a common conversation. The focal point "Russia in global dialogue" seeks to fuel debate on democracy, society and the legacy of empire. [more]

Eurozine BLOG

On the Eurozine BLOG, editors and Eurozine contributors comment on current affairs and events. What's behind the headlines in the world of European intellectual journals?
Eurozine
In memoriam: Ales Debeljak (1961-2016)

http://www.eurozine.com/blog/in-memoriam-ales-debeljak-1961-2016/
On 28 January 2016, Ales Debeljak died in a car crash in Slovenia. He will be much missed as an agile and compelling essayist, a formidable public speaker and a charming personality. [more]

Time to Talk     click for more

Time to Talk, a network of European Houses of Debate, has partnered up with Eurozine to launch an online platform. Here you can watch video highlights from all TTT events, anytime, anywhere.
Neda Deneva, Constantina Kouneva, Irina Nedeva and Yavor Siderov
Does migration intensify distrust in institutions?

http://www.eurozine.com/timetotalk/does-migration-intensify-distrust-in-institutions/
How do migration and institutional mistrust relate to one another? As a new wave of populism feeds on and promotes fears of migration, aggrandising itself through the distrust it sows, The Red House hosts a timely debate with a view to untangling the key issues. [more]

Support Eurozine     click for more

If you appreciate Eurozine's work and would like to support our contribution to the establishment of a European public sphere, see information about making a donation.

Vacancies at Eurozine     click for more

There are currently no positions available.

Editor's choice     click for more

Jürgen Habermas, Michaël Foessel
Critique and communication: Philosophy's missions

http://www.eurozine.com/articles/2015-10-16-habermas-en.html
Decades after first encountering Anglo-Saxon perspectives on democracy in occupied postwar Germany, Jürgen Habermas still stands by his commitment to a critical social theory that advances the cause of human emancipation. This follows a lifetime of philosophical dialogue. [more]

Literature     click for more

Karl Ove Knausgård
Out to where storytelling does not reach

http://www.eurozine.com/articles/2014-04-03-knausgard-en.html
To write is to write one's way through the preconceived and into the world on the other side, to see the world as children can, as fantastic or terrifying, but always rich and wide-open. Karl Ove Knausgård on creating literature. [more]

Jonathan Bousfield
Growing up in Kundera's Central Europe

http://www.eurozine.com/articles/2013-08-16-kuisz-en.html
Jonathan Bousfield talks to three award-winning novelists who spent their formative years in a Central Europe that Milan Kundera once described as the kidnapped West. It transpires that small nations may still be the bearers of important truths. [more]

Literary perspectives
The re-transnationalization of literary criticism

http://www.eurozine.com/comp/literaryperspectives.html
Eurozine's series of essays aims to provide an overview of diverse literary landscapes in Europe. Covered so far: Croatia, Sweden, Austria, Estonia, Ukraine, Northern Ireland, Slovenia, the Netherlands and Hungary. [more]

Debate series     click for more

Europe talks to Europe

http://www.eurozine.com/comp/europetalkstoeurope.html
Nationalism in Belgium might be different from nationalism in Ukraine, but if we want to understand the current European crisis and how to overcome it we need to take both into account. The debate series "Europe talks to Europe" is an attempt to turn European intellectual debate into a two-way street. [more]

Conferences     click for more

Eurozine emerged from an informal network dating back to 1983. Since then, European cultural magazines have met annually in European cities to exchange ideas and experiences. Around 100 journals from almost every European country are now regularly involved in these meetings.
Law and Border. House Search in Fortress Europe
The 26th European Meeting of Cultural Journals
Conversano, 3-6 October 2014

http://www.eurozine.com/comp/focalpoints/lawborder.html
Eurozine's 2014 conference in southern Italy, not far from Lampedusa, addressed both EU refugee and immigration policies and intellectual partnerships across the Mediterranean. Speakers included Italian investigative journalist Fabrizio Gatti and Moroccan feminist and Nobel Peace Prize nominee Rita El Khayat. [more]

Multimedia     click for more

http://www.eurozine.com/comp/multimedia.html
Multimedia section including videos of past Eurozine conferences in Vilnius (2009) and Sibiu (2007). [more]


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