Latest Articles


28.05.2015
Dmitry Uzlaner

Fifty shades of Russian fetishism

Anyone trespassing on any kind of sacred territory in Russia today must reckon with "millions of believers" taking offence and earnest calls to protect "traditional values". This, writes Dmitry Uzlaner, is the stuff of political fetishism. And the stronger the fetish, the weaker the responsible citizen. [ more ]

22.05.2015
Martin Schürz

Of hamsters and vultures

20.05.2015
Cathryn Costello, Mariagiulia Giuffré

"Tragedy" and responsibility in the Mediterranean

20.05.2015
Arthur Asseraf

French Republican values and free speech

19.05.2015
Luke Harding

Leviathan killed Boris Nemtsov

New Issues


Eurozine Review


20.05.2015
Eurozine Review

Perfect for television

"New Eastern Europe" has the lowdown on Leviathan's elimination of Boris Nemtsov; "openDemocracy" says talk of tragedy in the Mediterranean will end when taking responsibility begins; in "Blätter", Naomi Klein urges opponents of austerity to join forces with campaigners for climate justice; "Free Speech Debate" questions France's track record as a beacon of free speech; "Mittelweg 36" tries to keep the emotions in check, as the war on terror rages on; "Fronesis" sees a need for a movement of sameness rather than of difference; "La Revue nouvelle" contemplates the limits to autonomy; "Magyar Lettre" takes a trip through the Slovakian literary landscape; "Host" examines the Czech connection in the life and works of Philip Roth; and "Letras Libres" presents a late portrait of Tomas Tranströmer.

06.05.2015
Eurozine Review

Of punks and dumpster divers

22.04.2015
Eurozine Review

Capitalism's animal spirits

08.04.2015
Eurozine Review

Everything is PR

25.03.2015
Eurozine Review

Stop press: The world will not end!



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Dmitry Uzlaner

Fifty shades of Russian fetishism

Anyone trespassing on any kind of sacred territory in Russia today must reckon with "millions of believers" taking offence and earnest calls to protect "traditional values". This, writes Dmitry Uzlaner, is the stuff of political fetishism. And the stronger the fetish, the weaker the responsible citizen. [more]

28.05.2015


Martin Schürz

Of hamsters and vultures

Even entire countries can be sold off at rock-bottom prices

The global debate on how to handle sovereign debt shows that predatory behaviour has become an issue for countries around the world. And in the acute situation in Argentina, writes Martin Schürz, there should be no illusions as to where economic power actually lies. [English version added] [more]

22.05.2015


Cathryn Costello, Mariagiulia Giuffré

"Tragedy" and responsibility in the Mediterranean

The European Union plans to use costly military operations to suppress refugee mobility, write Mariagiulia Giuffré and Cathryn Costello. This means, in short, responding to those fleeing war, repression and human rights abuses with more of the same. So what are the alternatives? [more]

20.05.2015


Arthur Asseraf

French Republican values and free speech

Claiming free speech as a "Republican", "French" or "western" value by conjuring a mythical pantheon of canonical Enlightenment figures will not help us build more inclusive societies. So says Arthur Asseraf, in reconsidering France's track record as a beacon of press freedom. [more]

20.05.2015


Luke Harding

Leviathan killed Boris Nemtsov

A postmodern media strategy has so far sustained an optimal level of intrigue and mystery around Boris Nemtsov's assassination, writes Luke Harding. But what one can say with certainty is this: in Putin's Russia, troublesome critics of the Kremlin have an uncanny habit of ending up dead. [more]

19.05.2015


Phillip Lopate, Naief Yehya

Now's a good moment for the essay!

A conversation with Phillip Lopate

The essay is a fantastic mode of expression in uncertain times, says Phillip Lopate. It's like planting a flag in the middle of all the chaos. But it has to have the power to carry the reader from one side to the other, adds Lopate, it cannot be merely a collection of free associations. [more]

20.05.2015


Sven Opitz

In a time of emergency laws

Affective and legal domains in the war on terror

The practice of targeted killings in the war on terror, writes Sven Opitz, makes a mockery of received notions of due process in liberal states. Welcome to the global battlespace, in which a creeping new military urbanism is becoming ever more tangible. [more]

19.05.2015


David Begrich

Tröglitz, and the spread of pragmatic racism

The case of an independent mayor requiring police protection, after he offered accommodation to refugees in his community, made national headlines in Germany. David Begrich condemns the discrepancy between numerous local initiatives to help refugees, and the dearth of wider public support. [more]

20.05.2015


Eurozine Review

Perfect for television

"New Eastern Europe" has the lowdown on Leviathan's elimination of Boris Nemtsov; "openDemocracy" says talk of tragedy in the Mediterranean will end when taking responsibility begins; in "Blätter", Naomi Klein urges opponents of austerity to join forces with campaigners for climate justice; "Free Speech Debate" questions France's track record as a beacon of free speech; "Mittelweg 36" tries to keep the emotions in check, as the war on terror rages on; "Fronesis" sees a need for a movement of sameness rather than of difference; "La Revue nouvelle" contemplates the limits to autonomy; "Magyar Lettre" takes a trip through the Slovakian literary landscape; "Host" examines the Czech connection in the life and works of Philip Roth; and "Letras Libres" presents a late portrait of Tomas Tranströmer. [more]

20.05.2015


Nikolay Mitrokhin

Charlie Hebdo's Russian afterlife

Russian responses to the Charlie Hebdo attack in Paris reveal the contradictions of political and social trends in today's Russia, writes Nikolay Mitrokhin; with the most dramatic response being the unprecedented political killing of leading opposition politician Boris Nemtsov. [Russian version added] [more]

12.05.2015


Ilija Trojanow

Security versus freedom: A misleading trade-off

In the wake of the technological revolution that is the Internet, writes Ilija Trojanow, principles of self-organization and collaboration might be expected to replace established hierarchies and concentrations of power. Instead, the technologies of surveillance now available to states have never been more intrusive. [more]

15.05.2015


Mikhail Rozhanskiy

The empire's Siberian knots

Siberia survives as a single name for a territory covering two-thirds of Russia. Yet it comprises well over a dozen regions, republics and territories. Look at how the borders of Siberia were defined, writes Mikhail Rozhanskiy, and you grasp the imperial nature of Russia's social space. [Russian version added] [more]

12.05.2015


Kadri Kasemets, Franz Krause, Anne Kull, Tarmo Pikner, Maaris Raudsepp

The unnatural and cultural theory

Policing boundaries, articulating claims and positioning the human

In a world where the natural and the unnatural emerge as shifting configurations of matter and meaning, cultural theory can and should expand its frame of reference beyond what the "natural sciences" have left over, to embrace the spectrum of phenomena in which culture is cultivated. [Estonian version added] [more]

12.05.2015


Timothy Snyder

When Stalin was Hitler's ally

As Russia revives the tradition of wars of aggression on European territory, Vladimir Putin has chosen to rehabilitate the Molotov-Ribbentrop pact as good foreign policy. But why violate now what was for so long a Soviet taboo? Timothy Snyder explains. [more]

08.05.2015


Tatiana Zhurzhenko

Russia's never-ending war against "fascism"

Memory politics in the Russian-Ukrainian conflict

Seventy years after the end of World War II, writes Tatiana Zhurzhenko, the fight for hegemony in Europe continues -- disguised as a conflict of historical master narratives. The beginning of the current round of memory wars in the post-Soviet space can be dated back to 2005, when the sixtieth anniversary of the victory over Nazi Germany turned into a loyalty test for the politicians of neighbouring countries. [more]

08.05.2015


Dietmar Müller, Stefan Troebst

History, remembrance and the Molotov-Ribbentrop Pact

Seventy years after the end of World War II, Dietmar Müller and Stefan Troebst consider the pact that started it. The Molotov-Ribbentrop pact has remained the subject of fierce controversy, right up until Russia's annexation of Crimea and destabilization of eastern Ukraine. [more]

08.05.2015


Eurozine Review

Of punks and dumpster divers

"Wespennest" discovers a wealth of high-end subject matter in junk; "Critique and Humanism" samples eastern European youth cultures; "dérive" has the latest on speculative urbanism from Belgrade Waterfront; "Osteuropa" discerns a torn country in Ukraine; "Dilema veche" recalls the discovery of civil society in Romania; "Akadeemia" reveals a productive affinity between the unnatural and cultural theory; "Free Speech Debate" asks, can a book be too dangerous for the public? and "Sodobnost" proves that literature cannot be contained, stopped or rationed. [more]

06.05.2015


Mark N. Katz

Russia, Ukraine and the West

In the event that the West musters even a semblance of unity in response to the destruction of eastern Ukraine, Mark N. Katz has some suggestions as to possible courses of action. Not that any of these can be considered in isolation from Vladimir Putin's possible goals. [more]

06.05.2015


Iva Cukic, Dubravka Sekulic, Ljubica Slavkovic, Ana Vilenica

Report from Belgrade Waterfront

Four activist scholars report on the multi-billion euro Belgrade Waterfront development in Serbia. As the government's deficit reaches an all-time high and radical cuts in public financing are forced through, this is a project, they write, that looks like economic suicide. [more]

06.05.2015


Kadri Kasemets, Franz Krause, Anne Kull, Tarmo Pikner, Maaris Raudsepp

The unnatural and cultural theory

Policing boundaries, articulating claims and positioning the human

In a world where the natural and the unnatural emerge as shifting configurations of matter and meaning, cultural theory can and should expand its frame of reference beyond what the "natural sciences" have left over, to embrace the spectrum of phenomena in which culture is cultivated. [Estonian version added] [more]

12.05.2015


Sebastian Huempfer

Can a book be too dangerous for the public?

To some, writes Sebastian Huempfer, a republication of Hitler's "Mein Kampf" symbolizes a triumph of liberty over hatred. To others, it demonstrates how much forbearance liberal democracies demand from their most vulnerable citizens and how much space they give to their own enemies. [more]

06.05.2015


Martin Schürz

Of hamsters and vultures

Even entire countries can be sold off at rock-bottom prices

The global debate on how to handle sovereign debt shows that predatory behaviour has become an issue for countries around the world. And in the acute situation in Argentina, writes Martin Schürz, there should be no illusions as to where economic power actually lies. [English version added] [more]

22.05.2015


Dennis Eversberg

The trashing of life

On the depreciation of labour power in atomistic capitalism

Whether you frequent discount grocery stores or organic food shops, clothing discounters or designer boutiques, you can't help noticing that the fabric of society is becoming increasingly frayed, argues Dennis Eversberg. Meanwhile, the demand for casual labour on junk wages remains high. [more]

06.05.2015


Martin Aust

Unlike in Monty Python's "Life of Brian"

A response to Anna Veronika Wendland's criticism

Martin Aust responds to Anna Veronika Wendland's criticism that German scholars of eastern European history have so far largely failed to deliver anything like watertight expertise in the public debate about conflict in eastern Ukraine. [more]

06.05.2015


Eurozine News Item

Wojciech Przybylski assumes post of Editor-in-Chief

On 1 May, Wojciech Przybylski took up his new post as Editor-in-Chief of Eurozine, after a successful spell at the prestigious Polish journal "Res Publica Nowa". Commenting on what the future holds, Przybylski sets out his vision for Eurozine amid the challenges and controversies of our time. [more]

05.04.2015


Mikhail Rozhanskiy

The empire's Siberian knots

Siberia survives as a single name for a territory covering two-thirds of Russia. Yet it comprises well over a dozen regions, republics and territories. Look at how the borders of Siberia were defined, writes Mikhail Rozhanskiy, and you grasp the imperial nature of Russia's social space. [Russian version added] [more]

12.05.2015


Eurozine News Item

Between truth and power

Interdisciplinary conference, Riga, 1-2 May 2015

Who has the power to write Europe's narrative? At an event in the National Library of Latvia, Riga, that coincides with Latvia's presidency of the Council of the EU, leading scholars and writers discuss the role of authors in building and changing Europe. [more]

27.04.2015


Manuel Arias Maldonado

Podemos: Much more than just a marriage of minds

Founded in 2014, Podemos already leads opinion polls across Spain. But accusations that it is treating the country as a gigantic piece of fieldwork and conjecture as to its rootedness in political theory tend to be wide of the mark, writes Manuel Arias Maldonado. [English version added] [more]

24.04.2015


Eric Bonse

German Europe's ascendancy

German dominance of the European Union's upper echelons has never been greater, writes Eric Bonse. All EU actors are, for now, the pawns of a "German Europe" that is stronger, and yet more vulnerable, than ever before. [English version added] [more]

24.04.2015


Michail Dimitrakopoulos

Syriza and the destiny of modern Greece

The Syriza-Anel alliance prompts Michail Dimitrakopoulos to highlight parallels between Greece's situation today and the analysis that Greek-French philosopher Kostas Axelos presented in a 1954 "Esprit" article entitled "The destiny of modern Greece". [more]

23.04.2015


Bill Frelick, Judith Sunderland

Humanitarian rhetoric, inhumane treatment

The European Union's approach to migrants

In an article first published prior to the 19 April capsizing of a wooden fishing boat and consequent drowning of around 800 migrants in the Mediterranean, Judith Sunderland and Bill Frelick warn about the EU's preference for border enforcement over the creation of safe, legal channels into the EU. [more]

22.04.2015


Anne Applebaum, Lukasz Pawlowski

Russia: A sick man with a gun

Anne Applebaum in conversation with Lukasz Pawlowski

For many European countries to start thinking about Russia as a threat again, 20 years after the end of the Cold War, requires a paradigm shift. So says Anne Applebaum, as she sees political leaders who made their careers in conditions of European peace flounder in the current military crisis. [more]

22.04.2015


Eurozine Review

Capitalism's animal spirits

"openDemocracy" condemns the European Union's inhumane treatment of migrants; "Kultura Liberalna" talks to Anne Applebaum; in "Blätter", Rolf Hosfeld marks the centenary of the Armenian genocide; "Esprit" re-reads Kostas Axelos on the destiny of modern Greece; "Varlik" remembers Yasar Kemal; "Letras Libres" contemplates a concept of tolerance turned upside down, after 10 years of cartoon controversy; "Spilne" rejects the pro-/anti-westernism surrounding the Maidan protests; "Samtiden" takes stock of last year's Norwegian novels; and "Polar" critiques a new DIY mentality in the search for alternative ways of life. [more]

22.04.2015


Anna-Catharina Gebbers

Life as Gesamtkunstwerk

Wagner, Beuys, Schlingensief

The Gesamtkunstwerk, or total work of art, expresses a desire for the reconciliation of art and life, language and image, the self and nature, body and soul, and, not least, the individual and society. In so doing, writes Anna-Catharina Gebbers, it urges one to seek new, inspiring ways of life. [more]

22.04.2015


Daniel Gascon, Flemming Rose

The most important minority

Or, how the freedom of expression debate went global

Almost a decade after Flemming Rose, then culture editor of the Danish newspaper "Jyllands-Posten", published the first Muhammad cartoons, the "Charlie Hebdo" massacre provides a tragic backdrop to renewed debate about the very topics that Rose set out to explore in the first place. [more]

22.04.2015


Michael R. Krätke

Greek trial of stength

Either European social democrats show solidarity for Syriza's bid to end austerity, writes Michael R. Krätke, or they stick with the pig-headed ideologues of austerity and drive the European project deeper and deeper into the mud; a scenario that won't get any prettier in the event of a Grexit. [more]

22.04.2015


Judith Vidal-Hall

Taking on the giant

When a group of claimants in the United Kingdom took on Google for invasion of privacy, they had little idea that the case would become a landmark in the fight to tame the Internet giant's intrusion into our lives on the Web, writes Judith Vidal-Hall. [more]

17.04.2015


Simon Davies

Freedom through surveillance

Parading under the banner of a common front for freedom, governments worldwide have embarked on a security clampdown whose political fallout could be more damaging than the threat it seeks to banish, writes Simon Davies. [more]

17.04.2015


Mykola Riabchuk

Turn to the right - and back

As Walter Benjamin once remarked, "every rise of Fascism bears witness to a failed revolution". A statement that events in Ukraine after the Orange revolution go some way toward confirming, writes Mykola Riabchuk; not that a sudden reversal of recent trends remains out of the question. [more]

15.04.2015


George Blecher

Not bad for a lame duck

Much as the media like to call Barack Obama a "lame duck President", he's begun to look pretty agile of late. So says George Blecher. A portrait of Obama, the most consistent US president in decades, dispatched from inside the land of the free. [French version added] [more]

13.04.2015


Elmar Altvater

Controlling the future

Edward Snowden and the Anthropocene

The worldwide spying operation is about more than security and counter-terrorism; rather, it is a part of a broader strategy aimed at controlling global information, writes political scientist Elmar Altvater. Opposition needs to grasp the geological significance of the planetary data theft. [more]

13.04.2015


Nikolay Mitrokhin

Charlie Hebdo's Russian afterlife

Russian responses to the Charlie Hebdo attack in Paris reveal the contradictions of political and social trends in today's Russia, writes Nikolay Mitrokhin; with the most dramatic response being the unprecedented political killing of leading opposition politician Boris Nemtsov. [Russian version added] [more]

12.05.2015


Stefan Auer

The Holocaust as fiction

From Andrzej Wajda's "Korczak" to Quentin Tarantino's "Inglorious Basterds"

"Whereof one cannot speak, thereof one must be silent." However, what if remaining silent is unacceptable? Then Wittgenstein's famous dictum no longer helps, writes Stefan Auer. Then one narrates stories, even cinematic ones. [more]

08.04.2015


Jacob Mukherjee

Occupy and the 99%

Understanding Occupy politics

A highly individualist identity politics is clearly one of the mainstays of the culture of the new capitalism. But, asks Jacob Mukherjee, could this also be precisely what constitutes a barrier to the formation of a collective political subject in the first place? [more]

08.04.2015


Bronislovas Kuzmickas

From a distance

Postmodern identity in an increasingly postmodern reality

Why is it that, 25 years after independence, the attachment that Lithuanian citizens once felt to their country has weakened considerably? Because postmodernist self-consciousness prefers regional identity to state identity? Bronislovas Kuzmickas reports. [more]

08.04.2015


Claus Pias

Friedrich Kittler and the "misuse of military equipment"

Or, how to historicize media theory

Today's monolithic devices have taken us a long way from the do-it-yourself and home computer culture at its height in the 1980s. But has the account that new media theory pioneer Friedrich Kittler gave of that culture withstood the test of time? Claus Pias takes stock. [more]

08.04.2015


Janis Karklins, Wojciech Przybylski, Raul Rebane

Controlling the trolls

On Russia's information war

As the voices of genuine journalists risk being drowned out amid a plethora of agents of propaganda, what is the best media strategy for small states? Wojciech Przybylski leads a discussion on the latest information war. [Polish version added] [more]

08.04.2015


Evie Papada

Extractivism above all?

Global economics, local resistance

Intensifying the exploitation of underground resources has been suggested as a solution for Europe's crisis-ridden regions. But who really owns these resources? And where do the proceeds from their exploitation go? Evie Papada reviews the situation in the villages of Chalkidiki, Greece. [more]

02.04.2015


Claus Leggewie

Breaking out of the debt dilemma

How Greece can strengthen Europe

Political and economic relations need to be established that provide Greek society with a future in Europe, argues Claus Leggewie. But if this is to happen, even more important than dealing with the past is future-oriented investment in areas such as renewable energy. [more]

02.04.2015


Eurozine News Item

Eurozine at DIONYS'HUM

Cultural networks event in Paris, 14-16 April 2015

Between 14 and 16 April, DIONYS'HUM takes place at the Maison des Sciences de l'Homme in Paris. Incoming Eurozine editor-in-chief Wojciech Przybylski will be joined by Eurozine partner journal editors and regular Eurozine contributors for a roundtable on European networks. [more]

02.04.2015


Eurozine Review

Stop press: The world will not end!

In "Vagant", philosopher Alberto Toscano goes to the heart of today's fanaticisms; "Blätter" wonders where the rise and rise of a German Europe will lead; "Letras Libres" profiles Podemos; "Index" reveals how refugee stories are told; "La Revue nouvelle" slams the framing of the migrant as the ideal suspect; "A2" questions the scope of the Greek parliamentary revolt; in "Il Mulino", Nadia Urbinati sees right through the "Renzi sì, Renzi no" debate; and "Nova Istra" marks the long centenary of World War I. [more]

25.03.2015


Eric Bonse

German Europe's ascendancy

German dominance of the European Union's upper echelons has never been greater, writes Eric Bonse. All EU actors are, for now, the pawns of a "German Europe" that is stronger, and yet more vulnerable, than ever before. [English version added] [more]

24.04.2015


Manuel Arias Maldonado

Podemos: Much more than just a marriage of minds

Founded in 2014, Podemos already leads opinion polls across Spain. But accusations that it is treating the country as a gigantic piece of fieldwork and conjecture as to its rootedness in political theory tend to be wide of the mark, writes Manuel Arias Maldonado. [English version added] [more]

24.04.2015


Pierre Coopman

Copenhagen, Paris, Syria, Nigeria, etc

The cynical tendency to view tragedies and atrocities in European capitals in isolation from those taking place daily across Syria, Nigeria or Eritrea has to end, writes journalist Pierre Coopman. Until this happens, there can be little hope of seeing an improvement in anyone's security. [more]

25.03.2015


Andrea Goldstein

Anti-Semitism in France

The numbers of French Jews who have recently emigrated to Israel and North America, writes Andrea Goldstein, reflect a profound uneasiness on the part of Europe's biggest Jewish community. Anti-Semitism in France has deep roots, and is not about to go away any time soon. [more]

25.03.2015


Gisle Selnes, Alberto Toscano

Fanatical counter-histories

A conversation with Alberto Toscano

Liberal democracies are haunted by figures of radicalism, says philosopher Alberto Toscano. Moreover, as the associated policing of people is shadowed by a policing of language, the notion that all "extremisms" converge poses its own significant dangers. [more]

23.03.2015


Eurozine News Item

New Eurozine partner: Vagant

The award-winning Norwegian quarterly "Vagant" has joined the Eurozine network. Headquartered in Berlin, the literary journal's editorial network is spread across several Norwegian cities, as well as Copenhagen, Rome and Stockholm. [more]

23.03.2015


Almir Koldzic, Áine O'Brien

Taking control of the camera

An array of photography and film, visual arts, theatre, mixed-media storytelling and online journalism is dispelling notions of refugees as voiceless victims. Almir Koldzic and Áine O'Brien report on new channels providing an antidote to mainstream media coverage of life as a refugee. [more]

20.03.2015


Konrad Becker, Josephine Berry Slater, Felix Stalder, Pauline van Mourik Broekman

Mission interconnectedness

A roundtable on 20 years of Net culture

It's easy to underestimate the time reserves and technical resources required to establish alternative networks. So wresting back the power that today's Internet giants wield will require investing serious thought in how to foster a social climate geared toward the success of such projects. [English version added] [more]

17.03.2015


Catherine Malabou

Only one life

On biological and political resistance

Looking to move beyond the opposition between philosophy and the life sciences, Catherine Malabou insists on a political analysis of both branches of knowledge. The French philosopher turns to epigenetics and cloning as fields of research that can help bridge the gap between disciplines. [more]

17.03.2015


Cas Mudde

Local shocks

The far Right in the 2014 European elections

The far right straw man is certainly not new to the European debate, writes Cas Mudde. But it has gained in importance as mainstream leaders increasingly adopt a soft eurosceptic rhetoric (rather than policies), with a view to thwarting the advance of hard eurosceptic parties, most notably of the far Right. [more]

13.03.2015


Valeriu Nicolae

No accountability

The case of Roma social inclusion in Europe

The main stakeholders currently involved in Roma social inclusion continue to struggle to define clear and distinct responsibilities, or simply avoid them. Ahead of this year's European Roma Platform, Valeriu Nicolae calls for systemic change that addresses key issues of anti-Gypsyism and multi-stakeholder cooperation. [more]

12.03.2015


Ian McEwan

Not religion's enemy but its protector

The devout cannot have it both ways, writes Ian McEwan. Free speech is hard, it's noisy and bruising sometimes, but the only alternative when so many world-views must cohabit is intimidation, violence and bitter conflict between communities. [more]

11.03.2015


Carlos Spoerhase

Little magazines, great hopes

The little literary magazine defined literary modernism, flourishing in a sociotope of small publishers and galleries, independent book shops and literary cafés, clubs and cabarets. Carlos Spoerhase considers the medium's fortunes, after the decoupling of aesthetic and political concerns. [more]

11.03.2015


Mykola Riabchuk

Emancipation from the East Slavonic ummah

For both Russia and Ukraine, the conflict in eastern Ukraine marks the beginning of a painful process of emancipation from a pre-modern imagined community of eastern Slavs. A process, writes Mykola Riabchuk, from which modern civic national identities must emerge. [more]

11.03.2015


Eurozine Review

Putting the aesthetics back into politics

In "Free Speech Debate", Ian McEwan says freedom of speech is religion's protector; "New Humanist" explains why actor David Oyelowo left British TV to play Martin Luther King in "Selma"; in "New Eastern Europe", Andrew Wilson insists that Russia's propaganda is only skin deep; "Ord&Bild" discerns continuities between Greece's military junta and today's troika; "L'Espill" says we are all Greece; "Merkur" reconsiders the little literary magazine's capacity to bring aesthetic and political objectives under the same roof; Revista Crítica views the Mediterranean from the perspective of a universe of borders; "Passage" hears an echo on the literary telephone line; and "Vikerkaar" remembers moments of reprieve at the theatre in Tartu. [more]

11.03.2015


Andrew Wilson

Russia's "nudge" propaganda

When it comes to influence-peddling abroad, there is a certain logic in the Kremlin seeking to influence both left and right, nationalists and separatists, traditionalists and post-modernists, writes Andrew Wilson. And aligning them to a realpolitik that serves regime prosperity and survival. [more]

11.03.2015


Paul Mason

Who is Eleni Haifa?

On information technology and human character

Virginia Woolf's famous line – "on or about December 1910, human character changed" – haunts the present. For during the 2000s, writes Paul Mason, a combination of technology, broken economic life-chances and increased personal freedom changed human character again. [more]

06.03.2015


Filip Mazurczak

Poland's controversial Oscar

Is "Ida" really anti-Polish and anti-Semitic?

Pawel Pawlikowski's film "Ida" may have won this year's Oscar for best foreign language film; however, it is far from universally well-received in Poland. While some fear it will resurrect anti-Polish stereotypes, others accuse it of anti-Semitism, writes Filip Mazurczak. [more]

03.03.2015


Eurozine News Item

New Eurozine partner: Razpotja

The Slovenian quarterly "Razpotja" has joined the Eurozine network. Established in 2010, "Razpotja" swiftly emerged as a leading platform for young thinkers and authors. The journal now provides a unique space for new cultural and intellectual encounters. [more]

02.03.2015


Peter Schaar

Privacy as a human right

Edward Snowden and the control of power

The Snowden revelations revealed just how far some states had departed from the guarantees of privacy enshrined in the human and civil rights agreements of the post-war era. The European Union must take the lead in setting enforceable data protection standards internationally, writes Peter Schaar. [more]

27.02.2015


Alice Béja

The worst possible time for privacy

Following the Charlie Hebdo attacks, French public opinion is firmly in favour of giving greater surveillance powers to the state. Measures focus on online radicalization, including outsourcing policing to service providers, writes Alice Béja of "Esprit". [more]

27.02.2015


Vicky Baker

Controversial anti-terror measures

The UK government tried to rush through a "Snoopers' Charter" after Paris and is playing the security card in the run-up to the May elections. Opposition is weakened by parochialism and complacency, writes Vicky Baker of "Index on Censorship". [more]

27.02.2015


Daniel Leisegang

Double standards prevail

In Germany there has been heavy public criticism of the NSA. Yet the German government has failed to investigate the affair and has been quick to demand greater surveillance powers after the Paris attacks, writes Daniel Leisegang of "Blätter". [more]

27.02.2015


Anna Wójcik

The Atlanticist consensus

Despite residual hostility to state surveillance, the Polish response to the NSA affair both at the political and public levels was strongly pro-American. Will campaigning be able to change mainstream indifference to privacy issues? Anna Wójcik of "Res Publica Nowa" reports. [more]

27.02.2015


Ann Väljataga

Digital optimism prevails

In Estonia, digital optimism combines with free market scepticism about the regulation of the Internet. As a result, privacy concerns have been sidelined, while the activities of the security services remain obscure, writes Ann Väljataga of "Vikerkaar". [more]

27.02.2015


Thomas Lemaigre

Liberalism under stress

The Belgian government has held back from demanding greater surveillance powers after the terrorist attacks; how long liberal protections withstand rightwing pressure remains to be seen, writes Thomas Lemaigre of "La Revue nouvelle". [more]

27.02.2015


Miljenka Buljevic

The failure of politics

Despite public interest, Croatian politics is too fractious and self-centred to engage in serious debate about state surveillance, while data protection and digital rights are concepts yet to enter the mainstream, writes Miljenka Buljevic of Booksa. [more]

27.02.2015


Beate Roessler

What is there to lose?

Privacy in offline and online friendships

Friendship enables us to relax the rules of privacy we need in other types of social relationship. When friendship goes online, however, controlling privacy becomes more problematic. Are social networks causing a change in friendship as such, and if so, should we be concerned? [more]

27.02.2015


Elke Rauth

Smart tales of the city

The smart city industry is continually conquering new terrain. But in the global rollout of the digital electricity and gas meter (smart meter), Elke Rauth discerns a project that shows disdain for the private sphere and puts the intelligence of governments and city-dwellers to the test. [more]

25.02.2015


Volodymyr Sklokin

Turning public

Historians and public intellectuals in post-Soviet Ukraine

As scholars, historians must discover the truth about the past, writes Volodymyr Sklokin. But following the Ukrainian intellectual community's transformation after 1991, Ukrainian historians have also begun to find their feet as intellectuals responsible for sustaining a public sphere. [more]

25.02.2015


Corina L. Apostol, Dmitry Vilensky

ArtLeaks: From intervention to infrastructure

ArtLeaks founders Corina Apostol and Dmitry Vilensky look to the future in terms of how the grassroots organization might best reveal and resist the toxic symptoms of neoliberalism in the cultural sector; not to mention create a better (art)world. The next step: joining forces with other international actors. [more]

25.02.2015


Klaas Voß

The year of maximum danger

On the Able Archer war scare of 1983

Klaas Voß finds that literature on the threat of nuclear war in 1983 reads like Thomas Pynchon's 1973 postmodern masterpiece "Gravity's Rainbow". So how much light can a historian now expect to shed on what may seem like a case of ignorant armies clashing by night? [more]

25.02.2015


Antoine Garapon

What happened to us?

The Paris terrorist attacks of 7 January mark a distinct departure from previous attacks against France, writes Antoine Garapon. They are particularly shocking due to the way in which the French citizens who carried out the killings targeted specific "enemies". [more]

25.02.2015


Eurozine Review

The right to blaspheme

In "Esprit", a Catholic philosopher defends the right to blaspheme after the Charlie Hebdo attack; "Dérive" visits the unique urban lab that is Germany's post-industrial Ruhr region; "Krytyka" notes the ascendancy of the Russian language in post-Maidan Ukraine; "Frakcija" eavesdrops ArtLeaks' discussion of art and money; "Multitudes" says the art market's rigged; "Letras Libres" celebrates the art of biography; "Mittelweg 36" immerses itself in the world of work; and "Razpotja" says sexualized society leaves much to be desired. [more]

25.02.2015


Michael Azar

Bridge over troubled waters

Swedish author and scholar Michael Azar weaves together a patchwork of narratives in which people matter just as much as the places in which they live; a practice that provides the key to the long overdue task of fashioning cities in accordance with human needs and hardships. [more]

20.02.2015


Arna Mackic

Immortal moments

A jump into the water

The reconstruction of deliberately destroyed public and religious buildings in Mostar has raised many questions and controversies. Arna Mackic searches for a new open architectural language to encourage encounters between people, liberated from the burden of politics or ethnicity. [more]

20.02.2015


Rania Sassine

Beirut's heart

The life of a square

Martyrs' Square once featured among Beirut's most dynamic civic spaces. However, 25 years after the end of the Lebanese Civil War, the city centre's reconstruction has all but cut the square adrift from civic life. Rania Sassine insists on its potential as a Lebanese laboratory of urban identity. [more]

20.02.2015


Joe McNamee

Net neutrality: Protecting digital rights

Connecting privacy with freedom of communication and information

The convergence of online policing with customer profiling and traffic filtering means that privacy needs to be seen in connection with freedom of communication and information. The principle of net neutrality combines this set of digital rights, explains Joe McNamee. [German version added] [more]

17.02.2015


Étienne Balibar

A new impulse – but for which Europe?

The triumph of the principle of competition among and within European member states has generated a continuous aggravation of disparities, writes Etienne Balibar. But the French philosopher stands by his vision of a Europe other than that of bankers, technocrats and political profiteers. [more]

11.02.2015


Eurozine Review

Everything is falling down, now

In "Glänta", Imogen Tyler deconstructs the asylum invasion complex; in "openDemocracy", Thomas Fazi insists the troika saved the banks and creditors, not Greece; in "Belgrade Journal", Étienne Balibar holds out hope for a new and plural Europe; "Blätter" examines the current craze for pinning everything on your enemy; "Dilema veche" speaks to Razvan Georgescu about how Romania traded Germans for money; "La Revue nouvelle" criticises the international justice system; "Springerin" looks back at 20 years of digital media culture; and "Varlik" remembers Osman Cetin Deniztekin. [more]

11.02.2015


Thomas Fazi

The troika saved banks and creditors – not Greece

Greece deserves debt relief. Of this much Thomas Fazi is convinced. After all, most of the bail out money has gone to banks and creditors, which irrefutably puts to shame the claim that European taxpayers' money was used to save Greece and the other reckless countries of the periphery. [more]

11.02.2015


Jazra Khaleed

The AEGEAN or the Anus of Death

Known as a boxer and poet, Jazra Khaleed draws a parallel between the two disciplines: his writing has the attack and punch of a fighter. The poem presented here, translated from Greek, concerns the fantastic world of undocumented migration between the 24th and 28th meridians. [more]

11.02.2015


Imogen Tyler

Welcome to Britain

Anti-immigrant populism and the asylum invasion complex

Imogen Tyler looks at how the manufacture of an asylum invasion complex within the public sphere aided the passing of UK legislation that reconstituted the refugee as a "national abject". That is, as a (likely bogus) asylum-seeker subject to destitution, detention and exclusion. [more]

11.02.2015


Albrecht von Lucke

Terror and Pegida

Even as counter-demonstrations begin to outnumber the participants in weekly Pegida marches, Albrecht von Lucke expresses alarm at the fragile political landscape that has allowed the movement to emerge. Prolonged social and political alienation has taken on an ugly new quality. [more]

11.02.2015


Konrad Becker, Josephine Berry Slater, Felix Stalder, Pauline van Mourik Broekman

Mission interconnectedness

A roundtable on 20 years of Net culture

It's easy to underestimate the time reserves and technical resources required to establish alternative networks. So wresting back the power that today's Internet giants wield will require investing serious thought in how to foster a social climate geared toward the success of such projects. [English version added] [more]

17.03.2015


Eurozine News Item

New Editor-in-Chief of Eurozine

Wojciech Przybylski takes over after Carl Henrik Fredriksson

Wojciech Przybylski, who currently heads the prestigious Polish journal "Res Publica Nowa", is to succeed Carl Henrik Fredriksson as Eurozine's Editor-in-Chief. Fredriksson will leave his position on 31 March of this year. [more]

10.02.2015


Göran Dahlberg, Fabrizio Gatti, Linn Hansén

Camels don't pay in advance

A conversation with Fabrizio Gatti

Offering undocumented migrants the assistance that they need is well within the means of EU member states, says Fabrizio Gatti in interview. Instead, governments continue to bicker among themselves as to who is to pay and people continue to fall prey to the traffickers. [more]

06.02.2015


Peo Hansen

Undermining free movement

Migration in an age of austerity

How much longer can the European Union reasonably claim to guarantee the free movement of persons as a fundamental right? As the internalization of EU external migration policy starts to kick in, Peo Hansen examines the implications for the future of EU citizenship as we know it. [more]

06.02.2015


David Marcus, Roman Schmidt

Optimism of intellect

A conversation with David Marcus

Thanks to a new wave of small intellectual magazines, an infectious buzz has returned to public debate in the United States. Roman Schmidt talks to David Marcus who, as a new editor at "Dissent", is well placed to provide the lowdown what's driving this genuinely critical movement. [more]

30.01.2015


 

Focal points     click for more

The politics of privacy

http://www.eurozine.com/comp/focalpoints/privacy.html
The Snowden leaks and the ensuing NSA scandal made the whole world debate privacy and data protection. Now the discussion has entered a new phase - and it's all about policy. A focal point on the politics of privacy: claiming a European value. [more]

Beyond Fortress Europe

http://www.eurozine.com/comp/focalpoints/lawborder.html
The fate of migrants attempting to enter Fortress Europe has triggered a new European debate on laws, borders and human rights. A focal point featuring reportage alongside articles on policy and memory. With contributions by Fabrizio Gatti, Seyla Benhabib and Alessandro Leogrande. [more]

Russia in global dialogue

http://www.eurozine.com/comp/focalpoints/eurocrisis.html
In the two decades after the end of the Cold War, intellectual interaction between Russia and Europe has intensified. It has not, however, prompted a common conversation. The focal point "Russia in global dialogue" seeks to fuel debate on democracy, society and the legacy of empire. [more]

Ukraine in focus

http://www.eurozine.com/comp/focalpoints/publicsphere.html
Ten years after the Orange Revolution, Ukraine is in the throes of yet another major struggle. Eurozine provides commentary on events as they unfold and further articles from the archive providing background to the situation in today's Ukraine. [more]

Eurozine BLOG

On the Eurozine BLOG, editors and Eurozine contributors comment on current affairs and events. What's behind the headlines in the world of European intellectual journals?
Eurozine
Eurozine Gallery: TIME top ten photos of 2014

http://www.eurozine.com/blog/
Massimo Sestini's aerial shot of a boat containing at least 500 people attempting to cross the Mediterranean Sea, included in the current exhibition in the Eurozine Gallery, has been named one of the top ten photos of 2014 by TIME magazine. [more]

CHeFred
A master of the daily grind

http://www.eurozine.com/blog/
On Sunday 30 November, Turkish publisher Osman Deniztekin died, just a few weeks after having been diagnosed with leukemia. He was 65. In memoriam. [more]

Time to Talk     click for more

Time to Talk, a network of European Houses of Debate, has partnered up with Eurozine to launch an online platform. Here you can watch video highlights from all TTT events, anytime, anywhere.
Dessislava Gavrilova, Jo Glanville et al.
The role of literature houses in protecting the space for free expression

http://www.eurozine.com/timetotalk/european-literature-houses-meeting-2014/
This summer, Time to Talk partner Free Word, London hosted a debate on the role that literature houses play in preserving freedom of expression both in Europe and globally. Should everyone get a place on the podium? Also those representing the political extremes? [more]

Support Eurozine     click for more

If you appreciate Eurozine's work and would like to support our contribution to the establishment of a European public sphere, see information about making a donation.

Vacancies at Eurozine     click for more

There are currently no positions available.

Editor's choice     click for more

Felix Stalder
Digital solidarity

http://www.eurozine.com/articles/2014-02-26-stalder-en.html
As the culture and institutions of the Gutenberg Galaxy wane, Felix Stalder looks to commons, assemblies, swarms and weak networks as a basis for remaking society in a more inclusive and diverse way. The aim being to expand autonomy and solidarity at the same time. [more]

Literature     click for more

Olga Tokarczuk
A finger pointing at the moon

http://www.eurozine.com/articles/2014-01-16-tokarczuk-en.html
Our language is our literary destiny, writes Olga Tokarczuk. And "minority" languages provide a special kind of sanctuary too, inaccessible to the rest of the world. But, there again, language is at its most powerful when it reaches beyond itself and starts to create an alternative world. [more]

Piotr Kiezun, Jaroslaw Kuisz
Literary perspectives special: Witold Gombrowicz

http://www.eurozine.com/articles/2013-08-16-kuisz-en.html
The recent publication of the private diary of Witold Gombrowicz provides unparalleled insight into the life of one of Poland's great twentieth-century novelists and dramatists. But this is not literature. Instead: here he is, completely naked. [more]

Literary perspectives
The re-transnationalization of literary criticism

http://www.eurozine.com/comp/literaryperspectives.html
Eurozine's series of essays aims to provide an overview of diverse literary landscapes in Europe. Covered so far: Croatia, Sweden, Austria, Estonia, Ukraine, Northern Ireland, Slovenia, the Netherlands and Hungary. [more]

Debate series     click for more

Europe talks to Europe

http://www.eurozine.com/comp/europetalkstoeurope.html
Nationalism in Belgium might be different from nationalism in Ukraine, but if we want to understand the current European crisis and how to overcome it we need to take both into account. The debate series "Europe talks to Europe" is an attempt to turn European intellectual debate into a two-way street. [more]

Conferences     click for more

Eurozine emerged from an informal network dating back to 1983. Since then, European cultural magazines have met annually in European cities to exchange ideas and experiences. Around 100 journals from almost every European country are now regularly involved in these meetings.
Law and Border. House Search in Fortress Europe
The 26th European Meeting of Cultural Journals
Conversano, 3-6 October 2014

http://www.eurozine.com/comp/conversano2014.html
Eurozine's 2014 conference in southern Italy, not far from Lampedusa, addressed both EU refugee and immigration policies and intellectual partnerships across the Mediterranean. Speakers included Italian investigative journalist Fabrizio Gatti and Moroccan feminist and Nobel Peace Prize nominee Rita El Khayat. [more]

Multimedia     click for more

http://www.eurozine.com/comp/multimedia.html
Multimedia section including videos of past Eurozine conferences in Vilnius (2009) and Sibiu (2007). [more]


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