Latest Articles


23.04.2014
Nadia Urbinati

Between hegemony and mistrust

Representative democracy in the Internet era

Iceland's crowd-sourced constitution and the impact of Beppe Grillo's blog on Italian politics reveal how "Internet democracy" has opened a new phase of democratic innovation. The relationship between citizens and politicians may never be the same again. [Italian version added] [ more ]

23.04.2014
Ouidyane Elouardaoui

Behind the scenes of pan-Arabism

23.04.2014
Judy Radul

Marquee Moon

18.04.2014
William E Scheuerman

Civil disobedience for an age of total surveillance

New Issues


23.04.2014

Glänta | 4/2013

TV
23.04.2014

Arena | 2/2014

Velpellarnas vakuum
18.04.2014

Mittelweg 36 | 2/2014

Von Walden Pond nach Waikiki Beach
16.04.2014

Belgrade Journal of Media and Communications | 4 (2013)

Ultimate European crisis II

Eurozine Review


09.04.2014
Eurozine Review

Whoever shoots first loses

"Krytyka" says the protests in Ukraine should make the EU realize it has a global mission; "Prostory" documents the Maidan; "Osteuropa" warns it's high time to focus on the Polish extreme Right; "New Eastern Europe" locates the last frontier of Kundera's Central Europe; "Free Speech Debate" says hate speech bans have no place in fully fledged democracies; "Spilne" anticipates a socialist moment in the western system; "Merkur" analyses the capitalist persona: from civilizing force to the root of all evil; "Kulturos barai" ponders how to survive technology; "Revolver Revue" refuses to forget the Jews lost to the Nazis but erased under Czech communism; and "Dilema veche" asks who's afraid of Romanians and Bulgarians?

26.03.2014
Eurozine Review

Breaking the anthropic cocoon

12.03.2014
Eurozine Review

When TV regimes kick in

26.02.2014
Eurozine Review

Goodbye Gutenberg Galaxy!

12.02.2014
Eurozine Review

The new wretched of the earth



My Eurozine


If you want to be kept up to date, you can subscribe to Eurozine's rss-newsfeed or our Newsletter.

Latest Articles
Share |


Nadia Urbinati

Between hegemony and mistrust

Representative democracy in the Internet era

Iceland's crowd-sourced constitution and the impact of Beppe Grillo's blog on Italian politics reveal how "Internet democracy" has opened a new phase of democratic innovation. The relationship between citizens and politicians may never be the same again. [Italian version added] [more]

23.04.2014


Ouidyane Elouardaoui

Behind the scenes of pan-Arabism

The emergence of new private, transnational Arab TV channels in the 1990s raised hopes that, having shrugged off state control, Arab media would provide the kind of coverage that critical issues in Arab nations deserved. Ouidyane Elouardaoui investigates what went wrong. [more]

23.04.2014


Judy Radul

Marquee Moon

In 1969, some 600 million viewers around the world watched the first manned moon landing on television. But game shows, talk shows and reality TV became the enduring TV forms. Judy Radul takes another look at domestic scenes bathed in television's lunar glow. [more]

23.04.2014


William E Scheuerman

Civil disobedience for an age of total surveillance

The case of Edward Snowden

Earlier civil disobedients hinted at our increasingly global condition. Snowden takes it as a given. But, writes William E. Scheuerman, in lieu of an independent global legal system in which Snowden could defend his legal claims, the Obama administration should treat him with clemency. [more]

18.04.2014


Eurozine News Item

New Eurozine partner: Belgrade Journal of Media and Communications

"Belgrade Journal of Media and Communications" has joined the Eurozine network. The journal specializes in the political decoding of discursive formations concerning, among others, the end of history, post-secularism and the prospect of a cosmopolitan Europe. [more]

18.04.2014


Timothy Snyder

Europe and Ukraine: Past and future

The history of Ukraine has revealed the turning points in the history of Europe. On 25 May both Ukrainians and EU citizens can decide which way things will turn this time. Ukraine has no future without Europe, but Europe also has no future without Ukraine. [more]

16.04.2014


Tim Groenland

Lost in the funhouse

Like Joyce's "Ulysses", Nabokov's "Lolita" was once smuggled through customs in suitcases. Tim Groenland tells the unlikely story of how Nabokov's classic ever came to be published in the first place and then go on to become a commercial success. [Slovenian version added] [more]

14.04.2014


János Széky

A tradition of nationalism

The case of Hungary

In an article first published shortly before Viktor Orbán won his second term in office and Jobbik support soared in the April elections, János Széky outlines the historical roots of Hungarian nationalism and how the cult of national unity came to be written into the 2011 constitution. [more]

11.04.2014


Nataliya Tchermalykh

The warm cold winter

Three months of Maidan have led to the victory of a spontaneous micro-economy over macro-corruption, writes Nataliya Tchermalykh. That is, the victory of an economy based on grassroots collaboration and policy, as a prerequisite for everyday life. [more]

09.04.2014


Eurozine Review

Whoever shoots first loses

"Krytyka" says the protests in Ukraine should make the EU realize it has a global mission; "Prostory" documents the Maidan; "Osteuropa" warns it's high time to focus on the Polish extreme Right; "New Eastern Europe" locates the last frontier of Kundera's Central Europe; "Free Speech Debate" says hate speech bans have no place in fully fledged democracies; "Spilne" anticipates a socialist moment in the western system; "Merkur" analyses the capitalist persona: from civilizing force to the root of all evil; "Kulturos barai" ponders how to survive technology; "Revolver Revue" refuses to forget the Jews lost to the Nazis but erased under Czech communism; and "Dilema veche" asks who's afraid of Romanians and Bulgarians? [more]

09.04.2014


Volodymyr Ishchenko, Don Kalb, Anastasia Riabchuk

Political mobilization and the world system

The case of Ukraine and Russia

In interview before Euromaidan commenced, Don Kalb discusses the future of capitalism in eastern Europe. Given the rise of China and India, and economic stagnation in the West, Kalb emphasizes the importance of political mobilization in both Ukraine and Russia. [more]

09.04.2014


Arthur W Hunt III, Almantas Samalavicius

Technology and consumership

A conversation with Arthur W. Hunt III

Today's media, combined with the latest portable devices, have pushed serious public discourse into the background and hauled triviality to the fore, according to media theorist Arthur W Hunt. And the Jeffersonian notion of citizenship has given way to modern consumership. [more]

09.04.2014


Volodymyr Yermolenko

Dreams of Europe

There are two Europes, writes Volodymyr Yermolenko: a Europe of rules and regulations, and a Europe founded upon faith in the European idea. And of course, as recent events in Ukraine show, the European idea extends well beyond the formal frontiers of the European Union. [more]

09.04.2014


Eric Heinze

The case against hate speech bans

Rejecting the classical liberal defences of free speech, Eric Heinze insists that the strongest case for free speech is grounded on specifically democratic principles. And that hate speech bans can never claim a legitimate role in fully fledged democracies. [more]

09.04.2014


Andreas Kahrs, Eva Spanka

The movement on the march

Ruch Narodowy and Poland's extreme right

Poland's extreme right has long been ignored at home and abroad. Yet recent events reveal it is among the most dynamic of its kind in Europe, write Andreas Kahrs and Eva Spanka: the Warsaw "March of Independence" in November 2013, for example, attracted nearly 50,000 participants. [more]

09.04.2014


Francis Nenik

Oh where was he going?

The story of Edward Vincent Swart

Francis Nenik relates the life of poet and anti-Apartheid activist Vincent Swart, who practised his politics in Cape Town and Johannesburg, published his poetry in Cambridge, drank brandy by the bottle and argued with his cousin, a future president of South Africa. [more]

09.04.2014


Marek Seckar

The struggle never ends

Portrait of a professional revolutionary

Even if a humane and just society is just a dream, it is not one that humanity can afford to give up on. Of this much Walter Famler, outgoing editor-in-chief of "Wespennest", remains convinced. A portrait in prose by former "Host" editor Marek Seckar. [more]

09.04.2014


Jonathan Bousfield

Growing up in Kundera's Central Europe

Jonathan Bousfield talks to three award-winning novelists who spent their formative years in a Central Europe that Milan Kundera once described as the kidnapped West. It transpires that small nations may still be the bearers of important truths. [more]

07.04.2014


Steffen Kverneland

Seven years with Munch

Steffen Kverneland describes how the medium of the comic book opens up new approaches to biographies of artists. And how, in his graphic biography of Edward Munch, he lets a little light and air and humour liven up the sad, slightly dull atmosphere that tends to surround the painter. [more]

04.04.2014


Karl Ove Knausgård

Out to where storytelling does not reach

To write is to write one's way through the preconceived and into the world on the other side, to see the world as children can, as fantastic or terrifying, but always rich and wide-open. Karl Ove Knausgård on creating literature. [more]

03.04.2014


Jean-Louis Fabiani

Changes in the public sphere (1983-2013)

In this article based on Fabiani's speech at the Eurozine conference in 2013, the sociologist situates the events of Zucotti Park and Tahrir Square in a continuum that points to how future innovation may enable a global public sphere to overcome democratic fatigue. [more]

03.04.2014


Eurozine News Item

New Eurozine partner: pARTisan

"pARTisan", the Minsk-based magazine of contemporary Belarusian culture and world art, has joined the Eurozine network. For over a decade, the magazine's editorial team headed up by Artur Klinau has published a unique blend of aesthetic and intellectual content. [more]

02.04.2014


Jaroslaw Kuisz, Karolina Wigura

Poland's gender dispute

What does it say about Polish society?

An anti-gender campaign initiated by the Roman Catholic Church in Poland made gender a permanent fixture on the front pages of Polish newspapers as 2013 drew to a close. Karolina Wigura and Jaroslaw Kuisz introduce a new series of articles from Kultura Liberalna. [more]

28.03.2014


Agnieszka Holland, Lukasz Pawlowski

Conservative backwardness

A conversation on gender in Poland with Agnieszka Holland

Film director Agnieszka Holland considers the anti-gender campaign of the Roman Catholic Church in Poland a political attempt to cover up the Church's own problems; and contends that being a white, heterosexual, conservative Catholic Pole cannot be the only respectable way of living. [more]

28.03.2014


Marcin Nowak, Tomasz Sawczuk

Gender in Catholic Poland: Beyond ideology?

Marcin Nowak in conversation with Tomasz Sawczuk

The Roman Catholic Church in Poland is not merely scaremongering about gender: it wishes to seriously reflect upon the topic, insists Marcin Nowak. And despite the potential of every idea, including liberalism and Christianity, to become an ideology, serious dialogue will follow. [more]

28.03.2014


Piotr H. Kosicki

Why are the Vatican and Poland so far apart?

As shallow as it is reductive, containing no attempt at scholarly or exegetic analysis: this is Piotr H. Kosicki's verdict on the pastoral letter published 29 December 2013 by Poland's Roman Catholic bishops, condemning "gender ideology". So just what were the bishops thinking? [more]

28.03.2014


Vladislav Inozemtsev

How to win Cold War II

The West must start to put its long-term interests above the instant gratification of London bankers, German gas traders and real estate dealers all over Europe, who are yearning for Russian money. Then the new Cold War can be won, writes Vladislav Inozemtsev. [more]

28.03.2014


Vitaly Portnikov

The Jews and the Maidan

The Maidan has provided a historic chance to build a modern political nation where Jews can be Ukrainians, writes Ukrainian editor and journalist Vitaliy Portnikov. The misleading stereotype that Ukrainian nationalism is by nature anti-Semitic can finally be laid to rest. [more]

26.03.2014


Eurozine Review

Breaking the anthropic cocoon

"Reset" goes behind the scenes of Turkish power politics; "Samtiden" listens to the first hand accounts of child refugees; "Il Mulino" investigates the semi-slavery of migrant agricultural workers; "openDemocracy" keeps an eye on Balkan activism; "L'Espill" referees the footballization of the Catalan question; "Schweizer Monat" ushers in the age of BioArt; "Letras Libres" celebrates the centenary of Octavio Paz; "Varlik" reads Turkish science fiction; and "Host" says real literature is found lying in the mud. [more]

26.03.2014


Mario Vargas Llosa

Universal Mexican

A conversation with Mario Vargas Llosa

On the centenary of Octavio Paz's birth, Mario Vargas Llosa talks to the editors of "Letras Libres" about the distinguished poet, essayist and liberal. Not to mention one of the few intellectuals rooted in his world, but open to viewing it from all perspectives. [more]

26.03.2014


Domenico Perrotta

Beyond exploitation

Migrant workers in agriculture

The situation of migrant labourers in Italian agriculture borders on slavery, writes Domenico Perrotta. A mesh of ineffective immigration policies, a precarious labour market and the deeply entrenched caporalato or "gangmaster system" are to blame. [more]

26.03.2014


Jörg Scheller, Wolfgang Welsch

Thinking creatively: From Darwin to BioArt

In interview with Jörg Scheller, philosopher Wolfgang Welsch reveals the rigours of an evolutionary approach to questions of human culture and society. In doing so, Welsch outlines how, during the twentieth century, art begins to break through the anthropic cocoon. [more]

26.03.2014


Tigrane Yegavian

Gülen, Erdogan and the AKP

Behind the scenes of the power struggle in Turkey

Ahead of local elections at the end of March and presidential elections in August, Tigrane Yegavian looks into the influence that the Gülen movement wields in Turkey and beyond; and why this puts it on a collision course with the ambitions of its former ally, prime minister Erdogan. [more]

25.03.2014


Peter Dauvergne, Genevieve LeBaron

Corporatizing activism

Corporatization is transforming what activists and NGOs conceive of as being realistic and possible in terms of desirable change. Genevieve LeBaron and Peter Dauvergne examine recent trends that raise crucial issues about the future of global citizen action. [more]

24.03.2014


Jan-Werner Müller

Rising to the challenge of constitutional capture

Protecting the rule of law within EU member states

Despite being well aware of the stakes involved in member states such as Hungary, writes Jan-Werner Müller, the European Commission still lacks fully convincing instruments to deal with constitutional capture: a government's systematic weakening of checks and balances. [more]

21.03.2014


Almantas Samalavicius, Immanuel Wallerstein

New world-system?

A conversation with Immanuel Wallerstein

At some point, there is a tilt; there always is. Then we shall settle down into our new historical system. Wallerstein foresees one of two possibilities: more hierarchy, exploitation and polarization; or a system that has never yet existed, based on relative democracy and equality. [Russian version added] [more]

19.03.2014


Yudit Kiss

What pushes eastern Europe's Roma to the West?

One of the highlights of Hungary's EU presidency was the launching of the EU Framework for National Roma Integration Strategies. But a closer look at the situation of the Hungarian Roma provides an alarming picture, writes Yudit Kiss. And more than sufficient reason to head westwards. [Romanian version added] [more]

19.03.2014


Gilles Lipovetsky, Mario Vargas Llosa

"Proust is important for everyone"

In conversation with sociologist Gilles Lipovetsky, novelist and Nobel laureate Mario Vargas Llosa discusses the relative merits of "high" and "mass" culture in the contemporary world and defends the ideas explored in his recent book "La civilización del espectáculo". [Spanish version added] [more]

19.03.2014


Olga Sedakova

Russian society in the light of the Maidan

Poet and essayist Olga Sedakova takes her fellow Russian writers and intellectuals to task for responding with silence to the light emanating from the Maidan: a light of hope, of solidarity and of rehabilitated humanity. A light that Russia would do well to see itself in. [more]

15.03.2014


Nadia Urbinati

Between hegemony and mistrust

Representative democracy in the Internet era

Iceland's crowd-sourced constitution and the impact of Beppe Grillo's blog on Italian politics reveal how "Internet democracy" has opened a new phase of democratic innovation. The relationship between citizens and politicians may never be the same again. [Italian version added] [more]

23.04.2014


Eurozine Review

When TV regimes kick in

"Res Publica Nowa" slams liberal pacifism; "NAQD" greets a resurgent pan-Africanism; "Merkur" anticipates a golden future for quality TV; "New Humanist" rises above it; "Ny Tid" gives Rotten Tomatoes a low rating; "Osteuropa" wonders what happened to eastern Europe's generation X; "Genero" assesses the impact of recession on women in Serbia; "Vikerkaar" addresses the question of evil; "La Revue nouvelle" examines social phobias; and "Blätter" publishes Habermas' latest reflections on the limits of the nation-state. [more]

12.03.2014


Kenan Malik

The human heart of sacred art

The humanist impulse not only liberated the sense of transcendence from the shackles of the sacred, it also transformed the idea of transcendence itself. Kenan Malik on the humanization of the transcendent in art and literature, from Dante to Rothko. [more]

12.03.2014


Alain Joxe

Democracy in ruins

The case of the Middle East and North Africa

Alain Joxe deals with the logic of domination, as played out in the Middle East and North Africa right up until the era of financial globalization: in which states and subjects now find themselves caught between managed militarism and the immaterial mastery of credit. [more]

12.03.2014


András Bruck

Rear exit

The hollowing out of a state

Ahead of parliamentary elections in Hungary next month, András Bruck wonders whether the opposition can reverse the country's prospects. The point of no return, he writes, came on 2 January 2012, when the new constitution entered into force despite public protest. [more]

12.03.2014


Matthias Schwartz

Generation nothing

Portrayals of youth in eastern Europe's frustration prose

With reference to the novels of Irina Denezhkina (Russia), Serhiy Zhadan (Ukraine) and Miroslaw Nahacz (Poland), Matthias Schwartz assesses the cultural effects of commercial interests monopolizing the life world of young people in eastern Europe. [more]

12.03.2014


Karl-Heinz Dellwo, Gabriele Rollnik, Marek Seckar

It was impossible to live in this world...

A conversation with Karl-Heinz Dellwo and Gabriele Rollnik

Karl-Heinz Dellwo and Gabriele Rollnik spent decades in prison for their involvement in killings and kidnappings. Marek Seckar of Host meets the former members of the Red Army Faction and Bewegung 2. Juni respectively, to talk to the couple about their pasts and present. [Polish version added] [more]

12.03.2014


Timothy Snyder

Commemorative causality

Commemorative causality, the confusion between present resonance and past power, denies history its proper subject, writes Timothy Snyder. What is easiest to represent becomes what it is easiest to argue and, in lieu of serious explanations, only emotional reflexes remain. [Polish version added] [more]

12.03.2014


Wojciech Przybylski

Europe and the problem of force

In a timely opinion piece written prior to Russia's intervention in Ukraine, "Res Publica Nowa" editor-in-chief Wojciech Przybylski contends that should Europe rule out the use of force, it will clear the way for others who won't hesitate in using military might to achieve their political ends. [more]

10.03.2014


Vitaly Portnikov

A farewell to Russia

Russia may have won Crimea but it has lost Ukraine, writes Vitaly Portnikov. At the same time, Ukraine has gained a whole world of sympathetic people who support the country in its fight for something that should in fact be just as much a necessity for Russia too: freedom. [more]

07.03.2014


Aleksander Babich

"It will be easy for us to kill Russians and for Russians to kill us..."

Historian Aleksander Babich, a Russian-speaking Ukrainian, responds to Russia's military intervention in Ukraine in this Facebook status update of 1 March 2014: and is forced to entertain the prospect of combatants burying one another in the common graves of their grandfathers. [more]

07.03.2014


Kathrin Passig

The trouble with "us"

The blurring of social roles and the consensus illusion

Consensus among online communities may all too often prove fragile if not illusory. But, writes Kathrin Passig, as long as Internet users can adapt to groups that actually agree on only a select few issues, there is no need to lose faith in social media. [English version added] [more]

07.03.2014


Anton Shekhovtsov

From electoral success to revolutionary failure

The Ukrainian Svoboda party

The radical rightwing party Svoboda rose to prominence in Ukraine's 2012 parliamentary elections as an alternative to the political establishment, writes Anton Shekhovtsov: but its role in Euromaidan may well amount to Svoboda's swan song. [more]

05.03.2014


Claus Offe

Two-and-a-half theories

Post-democracy in the age of global financial markets

Beyond short-lived mass protests and a further swelling of the ranks of the popular right, the democratization of democracy is still possible, contends Claus Offe. But not if political life remains locked within the "prison of the market". [Russian version added] [more]

04.03.2014


Andreas Fisahn

Four years Merkel, four years eurocrisis

The German government's neoliberal route to a competitive Europe, together with Brussels' authoritarian governance of the economy, seems to have won acceptance: to Europe's detriment. Andreas Fisahn says it's high time to revise the Treaties of the European Union. [Romanian version added] [more]

04.03.2014


Iryna Vidanava

Living in the matrix

In Belarus, the digital dissident generation born in 2006 came of age during the political and economic crisis of 2011, writes Iryna Vidanava. However, bridging the gap between virtual and real-life activism remains one of the most serious challenges facing Belarus' democratic movement. [German version added] [more]

04.03.2014


Mykola Riabchuk

Revolution in Ukraine: Take three

The main threat to the revolution comes not from Crimean separatism nor from far-right groups, writes Mykola Riabchuk. The biggest threat comes from within: from old habits and oldboy networks. New politicians are needed to avoid repeating the missed opportunities of 1991 and 2004. [more]

28.02.2014


Beate Rössler

Desperately seeking women

Gender quotas were first discussed over 30 years ago; where introduced, they have successfully offset structural discrimination against women. So why do many countries still not have them? Concentrating on the German situation, Beate Rössler re-states the case. [more]

28.02.2014


Felix Stalder

Digital solidarity

As the culture and the institutions of the Gutenberg Galaxy wane, Felix Stalder looks to commons, assemblies, swarms and weak networks as a basis for remaking society in a more inclusive and diverse way, which expands autonomy and solidarity at the same time. [more]

26.02.2014


Eurozine Review

Goodbye Gutenberg Galaxy!

"openDemocracy" draws lessons from social movements in Bosnia and Italy; "Mute" embraces digital solidarity; "Schweizer Monat" holds a crisis session with David Runciman; "Esprit" confronts corruption's omnipresence; "Glänta" watches the reader turn the tables at the literary carnival; "Letras Libres" speaks to American poet Robert Hass; "Mittelweg 36" examines how media filters German memory; "Revolver Revue" uncovers unpublished poetic prose after Auschwitz; "Arena" anticipates continued growth on the Swedish far-right; and "La Revue nouvelle" surveys human rights in austerity Belgium. [more]

26.02.2014


Christoph Classen

Generation war

Filtering the memory of Germany's Nazi past

Last year's German TV production "Unsere Mütter, Unsere Väter" -- rights to which have been sold in 82 countries under the title "Generation War" -- portrays its protagonists as "people like us", controverting any notion of individual responsibility, writes Christoph Classen. [more]

26.02.2014


Antoine Garapon

Corruption: A crime against democracy

Corruption is omnipresent today, writes Antoine Garapon: it is the crime that characterizes our age. And only a political approach will lead to fighting it effectively because, currently, its practice is preferable to living at the mercy of the fluctuations of the market. [more]

26.02.2014


David Runciman, Michael Wiederstein

"Democracy is crisis"

In interview with Michael Wiederstein, the British political scientist David Runciman suggests how to remedy some of the myths that the eurocrisis has thrown into sharp relief: from genuine choice in politics or markets to the prospect of a purifying super-crisis. [more]

24.02.2014


Kenan Malik

In defence of diversity

It is wrong to make immigration responsible for Europe's social ills, writes Kenan Malik. Worse still is the way in which fortress Europe has created not only a physical barrier around the continent, but an emotional one, too, around Europe's sense of humanity. [Spanish version added] [more]

24.02.2014


Enda O'Doherty

Does European culture exist?

The deep historical roots of European culture may not lie in the geographical and political entity of today's Europe. But it is precisely here that the feeling of belonging inspired by the best that has been thought and said (and sung and painted and danced) needs cultivating, argues Enda O'Doherty. [Spanish version added] [more]

21.02.2014


Eldar Sarajlic

The perils of procedural democracy

A lesson from Bosnia

At the beginning of February, violent protests swept through Bosnia-Herzegovina: demonstrators clashed with police and government buildings were set ablaze. But then, independent citizens' assemblies began to be organized to formulate demands to be made to the government. [more]

21.02.2014


Stefan Auer

The end of the European Dream

What future for Europe's constrained democracy?

In trying to escape the banality of everyday life, utopian projects are bound to fail in politics, writes Stefan Auer. As such, the Great Gatsby of F. Scott Fitzgerald's novel and the EU have much in common: they always want more, despite being insanely rich; and still cannot pay their bills. [Russian version added] [more]

20.02.2014


Ivan Krastev

The transparency delusion

Disillusionment with democracy founded on mistrust of business and political elites has prompted a popular obsession with transparency. But the management of mistrust cannot remedy voters' loss of power and may spell the end for democratic reform. [German version added] [more]

20.02.2014


Peter Pomerantsev

Cracks in the Kremlin matrix

Peter Pomerantsev enters the matrix of managed democracy that underpins postmodern dictatorship in Russia. He discovers a society of pure spectacle where, amid fake parties, fake opposition, fake scandals and fake action, political technologists turn (almost) everything into PR. [German and Ukrainian versions added] [more]

19.02.2014


Dominika Kasprowicz

Filling in the niche

The populist radical Right and the concept of solidarity

Solidarity, one of the European Union's driving concepts, has been abandoned in the wake of the eurocrisis, writes Dominika Kasprowicz: allowing the populist radical Right to bring to bear their own concept of solidarity, based on an anti-establishment stance and nativism. [more]

14.02.2014


Eurozine Review

The new wretched of the earth

"Springerin" is arrested by images of political events; "Dérive" discovers in the rhythms of everyday life new sources of resilience; "Merkur" raises fundamental questions about the machinery of Germany's government; "Blätter" acknowledges that no machine is infallible; "L'Homme" finds not a single true self in the auto/biographical; "Krytyka Polityczna" reflects on film, factories and capitalism; "Dilema veche" looks rationally at the rise of Hungary's extreme Right; "Ord&Bild" critiques neo-colonialist narratives; and "Reset" reviews Italy's post-political, bitter-sweet box office hit. [more]

12.02.2014


Ayse Gül Altinay

Gendered silences, gendered memories

New memory work on Islamized Armenians in Turkey

The case of Islamized Armenian survivors of the 1915 genocide and the narratives of their "Muslim" grandchildren pose significant challenges to Turkish national self-understanding and the official politics of genocide denial, writes Ayse Gül Altinay. [more]

12.02.2014


Barbara Unmüßig

Three years "Arabellion": A women's spring?

Shortly after Tunisia enshrines gender equality into its constitution, Barbara Unmüßig surveys the situation of women in the countries where the Arab Spring began to play out three years ago. Self-organization, the role of Islam in society and sexual violence all remain key concerns. [more]

11.02.2014


Karin Norman

Shifting experiences of places in post-conflict Prishtina

Following the war with Serbia in the late 1990s, a construction boom transformed Kosovo's capital city. This has in turn transformed the rhythms of everyday life, writes ethnographer Karin Norman, as has an influx of rural migrants, UN and EU personnel and relief workers. [more]

12.02.2014


Horst Meier

Germany's constitution: Who's protecting whom?

In Germany, the observation of so-called "extremists" by the intelligence agency known as the Verfassungsschutz is based on an outdated understanding of constitutional democracy. The organization is in dire need of reform, writes Horst Meier. [more]

12.02.2014


Sharon Hayes

Certain resemblances

On performance, event and political images

Some images of political events can be conjured without being reproduced. At the same time as arresting the viewer, writes Sharon Hayes, they give pause as to how political affiliation, political community and collective political horizons are formed. [more]

10.02.2014


Volodymyr Yermolenko

Dreams of Europe

There are two Europes, writes Volodymyr Yermolenko: a Europe of rules and regulations, and a Europe founded upon faith in the European idea. And of course, as recent events in Ukraine show, the European idea extends well beyond the formal frontiers of the European Union. [more]

09.04.2014


Oleg Riabov, Tatiana Riabova

The decline of Gayropa?

How Russia intends to save the world

The Sochi winter Olympics are over but Russia's anti-gay laws remain. Tatiana Riabova and Oleg Riabov show how discourse in Russia brands "European sexual deviancy" a natural result of western democratic development; and Russia as the last bastion of "normalcy". [more]

05.02.2014


Kirill Rogov

Monopoly on violence vs. the right to rebel

A surge of state violence and the subsequent curtailment of citizens' right to protest, combined with an expansion of the authorities' right to use force: Kirill Rogov reveals how the "Putin doctrine" once applied to protests in Russia brought Ukraine to the brink of civil war. [more]

03.02.2014


Slavenka Drakulic

Flirting with a stranger

Women's writing on aging

Aging is a common literary theme though overwhelmingly confined to male writing, writes Slavenka Drakulic. Does dementia provide a culturally acceptable, metaphorical replacement for women's accounts of aging, and if so why? [more]

31.01.2014


Eurozine Review

The fragility of democracy

"Blätter" says Prussia was wide awake in 1914; "Rigas Laiks" locates the heart of Euromaidan; "openDemocracy" calls for change in European discourse on migrants; "Res Publica Nowa" seeks new forms of technological citizenship; "Il Mulino" demands that Europe stand by the Balkans; "Dialogi" has a flashback to the creative Eighties; "Mittelweg 36" revisits the former empires of crisis-hit Iberia; "Krytyka" considers Eurasian autocracy; "Gegenworte" enjoys Europe's riotous mixture; "Letras Libres" remains optimistic about public intellectuals; and "Free Speech Debate" reveals the contested meaning of freedom in Tunisia. [more]

29.01.2014


Szabolcs Pogonyi

After democratic transition

Will democracy in east-central Europe survive the economic crisis? Are democratic institutions and the middle classes strong enough to counter the authoritarian Left and Right? The real test for east-central European democracies is yet to come, writes Szabolcs Pogonyi. [Polish and Ukrainian versions added] [more]

29.01.2014


Iryna Vidanava

Living in the matrix

In Belarus, the digital dissident generation born in 2006 came of age during the political and economic crisis of 2011, writes Iryna Vidanava. However, bridging the gap between virtual and real-life activism remains one of the most serious challenges facing Belarus' democratic movement. [German version added] [more]

04.03.2014


Frederik Stjernfelt

Gagging for God

What if the attempt earlier this year on the life of a Danish Islam critic proves to be yet another instance of a concentrated assault on free expression by fundamentalist believers? Frederik Stjernfelt slams the critics of Enlightenment values for their complacency. [Ukrainian version added] [more]

29.01.2014


Stephan Ruß-Mohl

On the necessity of European journalism

If a genuinely open-minded European outlook were cultivated among journalists, then the European project would flourish for the next 50 years. Stephan Ruß-Mohl contends that a culture of European journalism is essential for overcoming the eurocrisis. [more]

29.01.2014


Simon Garnett

On data protection: In search of core European values

As the EU's response to the Snowden leaks converges with European data protection reforms, new debates on privacy emerge at the European level: and the burning issue remains that of trust. Simon Garnett rounds up the latest developments to coincide with Data Protection Day 2014. [more]

28.01.2014


Volodymyr Kulyk

Divisive nationalist actions cannot devaluate democratic Euromaidan

A response to Volodymyr Ishchenko

Of course radical nationalists do not share the original goal of the Euromaiden protests: bringing Ukraine closer to the EU. But neither do their slogans and attacks invalidate the protests' value as a manifestation of the democratic aspirations of the Ukrainian people, writes Volodymyr Kulyk. [more]

24.01.2014


Yuri Andrukhovych

Think about us!

In an appeal directed to foreign journalists, renowned Ukrainian writer Yuri Andrukhovych states that it is those in Ukraine's highest leadership that deserve to be labelled extremists, not the protestors on the streets. Yanukovych has brought the country to its limits. [more]

24.01.2014


Jason Wilson

After the burn: TED in Long Beach

How TED commodifies knowledge and closes down debate

The media organization TED sells itself as one of a new brand of arbiters and brokers of innovation. And yet, writes Jason Wilson, TED's preferred model of thinking is not the critical delineation of problems, or the formulation of better questions, but the closure of solutionism. [more]

23.01.2014


Andrey Kurkov, Myroslav Marynovych, Mykola Riabchuk

To prevent the escalation of violence

Statement of the Ukrainian Centre of the International PEN Club

After the Ukranian government rubber-stamped a series of repressive laws last week and further violence, the Ukrainian Centre of the International PEN Club releases a statement calling for support for Ukrainian writers and journalists, and solidarity with the Ukrainian people. [more]

23.01.2014


Mischa Gabowitsch

Both your houses

Protest and opposition in Russia and Ukraine

There is one central similarity between Euromaidan and other recent movements across the world: protesters' self-reliance and distrust of politicians who pretend to represent them is what gives their movement its democratic credentials, but it is also a weakness. [more]

22.01.2014


Slavenka Drakulic

The dogs of Sarajevo

A state apparatus that doesn't function on the level of dogs can't function on the level of people either, writes Slavenka Drakulic. This week, the Bosnian parliament votes on amendments to the law on animal protection. But what is in fact at stake is the continued dehumanization of society. [more]

21.01.2014


Rainer Hank

We Europeans

After the loss of innocence

No wonder the Germans accepted the idea of Europe so readily after 1945, writes Rainer Hank: they did not need to change their habits of thought greatly. Moreover, widespread ignorance about this problematic continuity poses yet another threat to mutual trust in Europe. [more]

17.01.2014


Olga Tokarczuk

A finger pointing at the moon

Our language is our literary destiny, writes Olga Tokarczuk. And "minority" languages provide a special kind of sanctuary too, inaccessible to the rest of the world. But, there again, language is at its most powerful when it reaches beyond itself and starts to create an alternative world. [more]

16.01.2014


Eurozine Review

It's back to the future for Eurasia

"New Eastern Europe" notes the coming of age of an interconnected generation; "La Revue nouvelle" disentangles the clash of interests behind the scenes of Euromaidan; "Soundings" contrasts yesterday's cultural bricolage with today's neoliberal culture; "Lettera internazionale" claims the decline of the West is on hold; "Magyar Lettre" imagines not a Fortress Europe but a continent open to other continents; "Multitudes" reviews attitudes towards African art and modern China; "Host" digests the last 50 years of literature and politics; "L'Espill" makes the case for Catalan literature as one among many European literatures; "Kulturos barai" takes a transatlantic perspective on big stories from small countries; "Nova Istra" remembers Mirko Kovac; "Sodobnost" talks about dance; and in "Syn og Segn" Jon Fosse says Catholic mass makes for better theatre. [more]

15.01.2014


Karl-Heinz Dellwo, Gabriele Rollnik, Marek Seckar

It was impossible to live in this world...

A conversation with Karl-Heinz Dellwo and Gabriele Rollnik

Karl-Heinz Dellwo and Gabriele Rollnik spent decades in prison for their involvement in killings and kidnappings. Marek Seckar of Host meets the former members of the Red Army Faction and Bewegung 2. Juni respectively, to talk to the couple about their pasts and present. [Polish version added] [more]

12.03.2014


Antanas Sileika

Long ago and far away: Big stories from small countries

Baltic stories in a global context

What's different about a place is what's interesting, writes Canadian novelist Antanas Sileika. A proposition that raises all manner of difficulties, as well as presenting unique opportunities, when writing fiction based on Baltic history aimed at a North American audience. [more]

15.01.2014


Adam Balcer

The emergence of a new (old) Eurasia

As Russia and the EU jostle to gain the upper hand in relations with post-Soviet states, China looks to strengthen its position not only in central Asia but in the buffer zone between Russia and the EU as well. A case of back to the future for Eurasia, argues Adam Balcer. [more]

15.01.2014


Andriy Portnov

Where now?

Locating Ukraine after Euromaidan

Disentangling the clash of interests surrounding Euromaidan, Andriy Portnov observes that the movement's European dream simply doesn't coincide with the visions that Brussels and Berlin have for the region. And that relations between Russia and Ukraine are no less strained. [more]

15.01.2014


Manuel Arias Maldonado

The book's futures

Should the printed book soon become a relic of a bygone era in publishing, uncertainty as to modes of sharing knowledge and experience will remain. Neither will we know, writes Manuel Arias Maldonado, whether to mourn the loss of the familiar or of the valuable. [Czech version added] [more]

14.01.2014


Ben Little

Parties, causes and political power

Today's slick electoral machines have debased the idea of seeking political power, contends Soundings co-editor Ben Little. Which marks a sea change since the first decades after WWII, when local parties were intensely engaged in candidate selection and struggles over party resources. [more]

13.01.2014


 

Focal points     click for more

Ukraine in focus

http://www.eurozine.com/comp/focalpoints/publicsphere.html
Ten years after the Orange Revolution, Ukraine is in the throes of yet another major struggle. Eurozine provides commentary on events as they unfold and further articles from the archive providing background to the situation in today's Ukraine. [more]

The ends of democracy

http://www.eurozine.com/comp/focalpoints/democracy.html
At a time when the global pull of democracy has never been stronger, the crisis of democracy has become acute. Eurozine has collected articles that make the problems of democracy so tangible that one starts to wonder if it has a future at all, as well as those that return to the very basis of the principle of democracy. [more]

Russia in global dialogue

http://www.eurozine.com/comp/focalpoints/eurocrisis.html
In the two decades after the end of the Cold War, intellectual interaction between Russia and Europe has intensified. It has not, however, prompted a common conversation. The focal point "Russia in global dialogue" seeks to fuel debate on democracy, society and the legacy of empire. [more]

Hungary

http://www.eurozine.com/comp/focalpoints/eurocrisis.html
In recent years, Hungary has been a constant concern for anyone interested in European politics. We have collected articles published in Eurozine on recent developments in Hungary and broader issues relating to Hungarian politics, history and culture. [more]

The public sphere in the making

http://www.eurozine.com/comp/focalpoints/publicsphere.html
The public sphere is not something given; it is made - over and over again. But which actors are involved and what roles do they play? Is there a difference between an intellectual and an expert? And in which media or public space does the debate take place? [more]

The EU: Broken or just broke?

http://www.eurozine.com/comp/focalpoints/eurocrisis.html
Brought on by the global economic recession, the eurocrisis has been exacerbated by serious faults built into the monetary union. Contributors discuss whether the EU is not only broke, but also broken -- and if so, whether Europe's leaders are up to the task of fixing it. [more]

Time to Talk     click for more

Time to Talk, a network of European Houses of Debate, has partnered up with Eurozine to launch a new online platform. Here you can watch video highlights from all TTT events, anytime, anywhere.
Robert Skidelsky
The Eurozone crisis: A Keynesian response

http://www.eurozine.com/timetotalk/the-eurozone-crisis-a-keynesian-response/
Political economist and Keynes biographer Robert Skidelsky explains the reasons for the failure of the current anti-crisis policy and how Europe can start to grow again. Listen to the full debate organized by Krytyka Polityczna. [more]

Support Eurozine     click for more

If you appreciate Eurozine's work and would like to support our contribution to the establishment of a European public sphere, see information about making a donation.

Vacancies at Eurozine     click for more

There are currently no positions available.

Editor's choice     click for more

Marcus Rediker
Ghosts on the waterfront

http://www.eurozine.com/articles/2012-07-27-rediker-en.html
Historian Marcus Rediker describes the sailing ship as linchpin of the emergent transatlantic economic order and instrument of terror for slaves transported from Africa, going on to discuss European harbour cities' role in the slave trade and their responsibilities in reckoning with its moral legacy. [more]

Literature     click for more

Olga Tokarczuk
A finger pointing at the moon

http://www.eurozine.com/articles/2014-01-16-tokarczuk-en.html
Our language is our literary destiny, writes Olga Tokarczuk. And "minority" languages provide a special kind of sanctuary too, inaccessible to the rest of the world. But, there again, language is at its most powerful when it reaches beyond itself and starts to create an alternative world. [more]

Piotr Kiezun, Jaroslaw Kuisz
Literary perspectives special: Witold Gombrowicz

http://www.eurozine.com/articles/2013-08-16-kuisz-en.html
The recent publication of the private diary of Witold Gombrowicz provides unparalleled insight into the life of one of Poland's great twentieth-century novelists and dramatists. But this is not literature. Instead: here he is, completely naked. [more]

Literary perspectives
The re-transnationalization of literary criticism

http://www.eurozine.com/comp/literaryperspectives.html
Eurozine's series of essays aims to provide an overview of diverse literary landscapes in Europe. Covered so far: Croatia, Sweden, Austria, Estonia, Ukraine, Northern Ireland, Slovenia, the Netherlands and Hungary. [more]

Debate series     click for more

Europe talks to Europe

http://www.eurozine.com/comp/europetalkstoeurope.html
Nationalism in Belgium might be different from nationalism in Ukraine, but if we want to understand the current European crisis and how to overcome it we need to take both into account. The debate series "Europe talks to Europe" is an attempt to turn European intellectual debate into a two-way street. [more]

Conferences     click for more

Eurozine emerged from an informal network dating back to 1983. Since then, European cultural magazines have met annually in European cities to exchange ideas and experiences. Around 100 journals from almost every European country are now regularly involved in these meetings.
Making a difference. Opinion, debate and activism in the public sphere
The 25th European Meeting of Cultural Journals
Oslo, 29 November - 2 December 2013

http://www.eurozine.com/comp/oslo2013.html
Under the heading "Making a difference. Opinion, debate and activism in the public sphere", the 2013 Eurozine conference focused on cultural and intellectual debate and the production of the public sphere. [more]

Multimedia     click for more

http://www.eurozine.com/comp/multimedia.html
Multimedia section including videos of past Eurozine conferences in Vilnius (2009) and Sibiu (2007). [more]


powered by publick.net