Latest Articles

Robert Menasse

A brief history of the European future

Or, why we must earn our inheritance

The sooner Europe gets used to a future without the nation-state, the better, writes Robert Menasse. Amnesia about what the unification project originally meant is causing a catastrophic lack of imagination about where it is heading. [Catalan version added] [ more ]

István Józsa, Geert Lovink

From data to Dada

Marc-Olivier Padis

The paranoid style in the digital era

Julia Macher

Catalan impasse

New Issues


Host | 8/2015


L'Espill | 50 (2015)

The European crisis. Europe as an idea and as a project today

Eurozine Review

Eurozine Review

Of technological waves and political frontiers

"Wespennest" refuses to let the machines takeover; "Letras Libres" sees citizen power as the key to a post-national European democracy; "Soundings" strikes out for a new political frontier in British politics; "Il Mulino" traces the shifting contours of the European debate on sovereignty; "Blätter" seeks ways out of the Catalan impasse; "New Eastern Europe" appeals to Europe's goodwill and openness amid refugee crisis; "Arena" reaffirms the Swedish people's overwhelming support for a humanitarian refugee policy; "Merkur" traverses the analogue-digital divide; and "Esprit" samples the paranoid style in the digital age.

Eurozine Review

Beyond imagination or control

Eurozine Review

What animates us?

Eurozine Review

If the borders were porous

Eurozine Review

That which one does not entirely possess

My Eurozine

If you want to be kept up to date, you can subscribe to Eurozine's rss-newsfeed or our Newsletter.

Share |

She stands a good chance of catching up with Mir Jam

Slavenka Drakulic's article is "sickly sweet, sentimental, nauseating talk coloured by propaganda", writes the Serbian painter Ljuba Popovic. She should look for "diligent" and "creative" Serbs so that she can "learn the truth".

Slavenka Drakulic's article is sickly sweet, sentimental, nauseating talk coloured by propaganda. She obviously listens to one side only.

Debating denial

The publication of Slavenka Drakulic's Eurozine essay "Why I have not returned to Belgrade" in the Serbian newspaper Politika has triggered a controversy on Serbia's responsibility for the wars in the former Yugoslavia. Read the debate in Eurozine.
A few days ago I was watching television in Paris: a French documentary, nicely done, about the Adriatic. It talked about islands, blueness, the beauty of the Kornat islands, and showed pictures of Korcula. The presenter then said that Dubrovnik, the second most beautiful town in the region after Korcula, could not be shown because the Serbs had destroyed it during the war. A lie becomes truth. It is similar to Slavenka's article about unhappy Albanians who suffered in the war only because of "bad" Serbs.

Mir Jam[1] wrote tear-jerking stories between the two world wars. Slavenka Drakulic writes tear jerking, politically coloured articles, and is not without talent.

If she dumps the politics, she would stand a good chance of catching up with Mir Jam. And she should write "in our language". The Serbs are a dignified and creative nation, proud of their history.

Like in other nations, there are black sheep among Serbs. Slavenka should look for diligent and creative people so that she can learn the truth.

Mirko Kovac, Boba Matic, Miro Glavurtic[2] left Belgrade long ago. They live, just like she, in Croatia. No one condemns them, but the best works they ever made were made in Belgrade.

Slavenka Drakulic shouldn't go to Belgrade. She should stay where she is. Afterall, what is there in Belgrade for her?


  • [1] The nom de plume of the author Milica Jakovljevic (1887-1952), often referred to as the "Serbian Jane Austen" – trans.
  • [2] Contemporary Croatian writers who lived in Belgrade – trans.

Published 2009-04-03

Original in Serbian
Translation by Alma Memic-Avdic
First published in Politika 28.03.2009 (Serbian version)

© Ljuba Popovic
© Eurozine

Focal points     click for more

The politics of privacy
The Snowden leaks and the ensuing NSA scandal made the whole world debate privacy and data protection. Now the discussion has entered a new phase - and it's all about policy. A focal point on the politics of privacy: claiming a European value. [more]

Beyond Fortress Europe
The fate of migrants attempting to enter Fortress Europe has triggered a new European debate on laws, borders and human rights. A focal point featuring reportage alongside articles on policy and memory. With contributions by Fabrizio Gatti, Seyla Benhabib and Alessandro Leogrande. [more]

Russia in global dialogue
In the two decades after the end of the Cold War, intellectual interaction between Russia and Europe has intensified. It has not, however, prompted a common conversation. The focal point "Russia in global dialogue" seeks to fuel debate on democracy, society and the legacy of empire. [more]

Ukraine in focus
Ten years after the Orange Revolution, Ukraine is in the throes of yet another major struggle. Eurozine provides commentary on events as they unfold and further articles from the archive providing background to the situation in today's Ukraine. [more]

Eurozine BLOG

On the Eurozine BLOG, editors and Eurozine contributors comment on current affairs and events. What's behind the headlines in the world of European intellectual journals?
Victor Tsilonis
Greek bailout referendum, Euro Summit, Germope
Victor Tsilonis of "Intellectum" (Greece) comments on recent developments in the Greek crisis: the short-lived euphoria of the 5 July referendum, Alexis Tsipras's subsequent "mental waterboarding", and the outlook for a German-led Europe. [more]

Time to Talk     click for more

Time to Talk, a network of European Houses of Debate, has partnered up with Eurozine to launch an online platform. Here you can watch video highlights from all TTT events, anytime, anywhere.
Neda Deneva, Constantina Kouneva, Irina Nedeva and Yavor Siderov
Does migration intensify distrust in institutions?
How do migration and institutional mistrust relate to one another? As a new wave of populism feeds on and promotes fears of migration, aggrandising itself through the distrust it sows, The Red House hosts a timely debate with a view to untangling the key issues. [more]

Support Eurozine     click for more

If you appreciate Eurozine's work and would like to support our contribution to the establishment of a European public sphere, see information about making a donation.

Vacancies at Eurozine     click for more

There are currently no positions available.

Editor's choice     click for more

Timothy Snyder
Europe and Ukraine: Past and future
The history of Ukraine has revealed the turning points in the history of Europe. Prior to Ukraine's presidential elections in May 2014, Timothy Snyder argued cogently as to why Ukraine has no future without Europe; and why Europe too has no future without Ukraine. [more]

Literature     click for more

Karl Ove Knausgård
Out to where storytelling does not reach
To write is to write one's way through the preconceived and into the world on the other side, to see the world as children can, as fantastic or terrifying, but always rich and wide-open. Karl Ove Knausgård on creating literature. [more]

Jonathan Bousfield
Growing up in Kundera's Central Europe
Jonathan Bousfield talks to three award-winning novelists who spent their formative years in a Central Europe that Milan Kundera once described as the kidnapped West. It transpires that small nations may still be the bearers of important truths. [more]

Literary perspectives
The re-transnationalization of literary criticism
Eurozine's series of essays aims to provide an overview of diverse literary landscapes in Europe. Covered so far: Croatia, Sweden, Austria, Estonia, Ukraine, Northern Ireland, Slovenia, the Netherlands and Hungary. [more]

Debate series     click for more

Europe talks to Europe
Nationalism in Belgium might be different from nationalism in Ukraine, but if we want to understand the current European crisis and how to overcome it we need to take both into account. The debate series "Europe talks to Europe" is an attempt to turn European intellectual debate into a two-way street. [more]

Conferences     click for more

Eurozine emerged from an informal network dating back to 1983. Since then, European cultural magazines have met annually in European cities to exchange ideas and experiences. Around 100 journals from almost every European country are now regularly involved in these meetings.
Law and Border. House Search in Fortress Europe
The 26th European Meeting of Cultural Journals
Conversano, 3-6 October 2014
Eurozine's 2014 conference in southern Italy, not far from Lampedusa, addressed both EU refugee and immigration policies and intellectual partnerships across the Mediterranean. Speakers included Italian investigative journalist Fabrizio Gatti and Moroccan feminist and Nobel Peace Prize nominee Rita El Khayat. [more]

Multimedia     click for more
Multimedia section including videos of past Eurozine conferences in Vilnius (2009) and Sibiu (2007). [more]

powered by